A big part of what’ll dictate which analytics platform you should use will depend on your budget. If your company is super data rich and every department is highly dependent on accurate reporting, you might already invest in a robust paid platform that can meet your video needs. If not, there are tons of free tools you can use that are just as good as some of the bigger, paid-for options.
The definition of video marketing is not complex. In fact, it’s rather simple: using video to promote or market your brand, product or service. A strong marketing campaign incorporates video into the mix. Customer testimonials, videos from live events, how-to videos, explainer videos, corporate training videos, viral (entertainment) videos — the list goes on.
With 360° videos, viewers “scroll” around to see content from every angle — as if they were physically standing within the content. This spherical video style allows viewers to experience a location or event, such as exploring Antarctica or meeting a hammerhead shark. Virtual reality (VR) allows viewers to navigate and control their experience. These videos are usually viewed through devices such as Oculus Rift or Google Cardboard.
There are endless platforms for video marketing. YouTube, broadcast television, video boards and street marketing, you name it. The possibilities are endless. With a smartphone, consumers can access online video anytime, anywhere. The same is not true with traditional, paper marketing. With video, you can reach your audience wherever they are in a cost-effective way.
These are just a few of the tangible and proven benefits of using video marketing for business. As more and more people turn to online video for entertainment, information, inspiration, and advice, it’s increasingly important for you to keep on top of evolving trends in video marketing so that your business can stay relevant and reap the benefits you deserve.

In addition to the entertainment aspect, more and more marketers are focusing on video marketing strategies because of how beneficial they are. Think about it from your own perspective for a minute. Would you rather read a long page full of text or watch a quick video to learn about a new product? Would you rather spend time reading about the steps of a company’s sales process or watch an animation to associate each step with a visual aid? If you’re like 80 percent of the population, you’d rather watch the video.
The QuickSprout University covers social media, email marketing, paid advertising, email marketing, conversion optimization, reputation management, link building, SEO and conversion optimization. It has many videos which start with a funny intro, however, there is NOTHING ELSE of value. The maximum length of the videos is around 6 mins and there are only a few written articles provided. They don’t have any kind of introduction video which shows what they will be teaching in the course and explain who the hell Brian Dean is. But that’s not all.
One of the best ways to improve the look of your video is to include b-roll. B-roll is the supplementary footage included as a cutaway. This might include shots of a customer service rep talking on a phone, a designer editing your website, visuals of your office, or even screenshots of your product. The key with b-roll is to make sure each and every piece enhances the story.
Next, consider your audience and the overall mood for your production. Are you targeting a small audience that will appreciate the newest, underground hip-hop track, or do you need something that will appeal to many demographics? Are you creating a practical product tutorial or an upbeat event recap? Be sure to choose music that enhances the overall tone of your video.
One of the most common challenges when implementing video marketing is figuring out how videos can bring more value to their audience, which is essential. Many businesses are making videos just for the reason of having videos, not to miss the bandwagon. Not only this practice won’t usually bring any results, but can disrupt your audience if you are not careful.
In 2019 content won’t rank as well as it used to. Yes, they say content is king, but we already know there are over a billion blogs. Google isn’t just picking from, hey what content do we want to rank because we lack content. They’re like, we have content on everything under the sun and the same thing a hundred other times. So now they’re just not picking what content do we want to rank. They’re looking at authority and user metrics and their even looking at when the content was created.
The company I work for really wants to make some videos that we can play for commercials or at the office. We have never made a video before, and were wondering what we should do. That is a good idea to make sure we tell a story with our videos. It would be good to make sure we appeal to our customer’s needs through stories. Thank you for all the tips! 

These are just a few of the tangible and proven benefits of using video marketing for business. As more and more people turn to online video for entertainment, information, inspiration, and advice, it’s increasingly important for you to keep on top of evolving trends in video marketing so that your business can stay relevant and reap the benefits you deserve.
2. The content quality is very important, but the production quality is not that important. Production quality and technical aspects have to be OK but not world class. Better production quality is correlated with more trust, but it can’t make up for the lack of substance. So, Facebook Live videos, webinar recordings, and other video material with good enough production quality will work as long as the content itself is engaging.
One of the best ways to improve the look of your video is to include b-roll. B-roll is the supplementary footage included as a cutaway. This might include shots of a customer service rep talking on a phone, a designer editing your website, visuals of your office, or even screenshots of your product. The key with b-roll is to make sure each and every piece enhances the story.
In the study, Berger suggests that feeling fearful, angry, or amused drives people to share news and information. These types of emotions are characterized by high arousal and action, as opposed to emotions like sadness or contentment, which are characterized by low arousal or inaction. “If something makes you angry as opposed to sad, for example, you’re more likely to share it with your family and friends because you’re fired up,” continues Berger.
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