As you craft your story, keep in mind the people who will need to approve your video (your manager, your company’s founder, your marketing department, etc.) and the time it takes to implement their feedback. Sudden changes in scripting, messaging, goals, and more can throw your whole production off-kilter. But still, these changes are all too common. Take a look at our creative guide that’ll help you manage creative feedback from everyone on your team.
Neil Patel is a scammer. There are no other word(s) to describe this guy. Maybe he knows a thing or two about internet marketing, SEO, etc, but everything else he does like teaching, webinars etc.. these are complete scams. Don’t be stupid and pay him to “teach” you how to create a website. You want to get traffic ? Then create a fan page, build slowly a following, create twitter page, buy media ads, make backlinks.. and work your way up. There’s no other way, there’s no shortcuts. Otherwise, everyone would be rich.
Sadly, posting a video on an otherwise blank page won’t do much for your SEO. Make sure you embed your video on a page full of relevant and informative content. This will let search engine crawlers know you have not only engaging multimedia on your site, but that you provide a ton of valuable and useful information. Be sure the content relates to your video — sometimes, posting the video transcript can help a lot, too.

I emailed him complaining that the “live” course was actually recorded. He wrote back, making excuses about how they used to do it live before Neil got so busy, and just hadn’t had time to go back and re-record Neil’s webinar-pitching video saying “live, won’t be recorded” and update the emails to remove the “live” references. Really? You had time to develop a webinar that would take my chat comments and add them to the recorded stream, but you didn’t have time to update your marketing materials?
Your first opportunity to delight comes directly after the purchase. Consider sending a thank you video to welcome them into the community or an on-boarding video to get them rolling with their new purchase. Then, build out a library of educational courses or product training videos to cater to consumers who prefer self-service or simply want to expand their expertise.
For example, if your goal was to boost trust in your business, then you should share videos that provide real value to your audience, such as how-to videos and videos with useful tips, along with video case studies, behind the scenes videos and other similar types of videos that help build trust. Or, if you wanted to boost your social selling, then you’d need to take a different route: more product-related videos showcasing the value of your products or services as well as the benefits they would bring to your target audience.
We’ve all heard it – time and time again – video is all the rage right now. And that is especially true of social media. From visual platforms like Instagram who are now embracing video even more than images to the more serious of platforms, like LinkedIn, all social networks are clearly all about videos right now. As a business though, it can seem difficult at first glance to come up – and deliver – a great social media video marketing strategy.
Hi, thanks for a great blog. In our office we have a debate going on about whether all of this video hype that we’re experiencing from basically everywhere today is really just, well, a hype.. In line with more and more companies using video marketing, text as we know it might fade out, pictures as we know them might fade out, but if everybody starts using video, what will then happen? Today, video is commonly seen as a way to stand out and capture users’ attention, but what if every brand start publishing video solely? Will we still want to see as much video? Will we need to capture the viewers’ attention in 2 seconds instead of 10? What do you think it requires for companies to succeed with videos and stay on top if everybody else is doing the same?
Video marketing is the growing trend. This is completely true. But, is it really effective? Of course. A company named Mint, garnered a lot of attention (approximately 700k YouTube views), and boost in sales using an incredible explainer video “Personal Finance Management With Mint – The Best Free Way to Manage Your Money”. Their video did not provide the advantage of their services, instead they beautifully explained the need of their services in a customer’s life. This is a perfect example of showing how a simple 1 or 2 minute video can change a customer’s perspective towards your brand. Your business can use similar ideas and provide value using an incredible explainer videos created by professionals such as FWA MARKETING, and gain a lot of traffic as well as profits.

Determine whether it’s better to create the video content in-house or to hire an agency to handle it. It’s tempting to go the in-house route as it’s generally seen as the most cost effective, but that can be a mistake. As Sophia Bernazzani writes, “Videos are hard to make – and it shows. The internet is populated with far too many slideshows and photos set to music that are masquerading as videos.”
A big part of what’ll dictate which analytics platform you should use will depend on your budget. If your company is super data rich and every department is highly dependent on accurate reporting, you might already invest in a robust paid platform that can meet your video needs. If not, there are tons of free tools you can use that are just as good as some of the bigger, paid-for options.
Now come the official steps: booking talent, scheduling timelines, hiring staff, purchasing equipment and props, and more. This can get hectic if you’re handling it all on your own. You’ll need a point of contact for all your actors, production assistants, even licenses if you’re filming in certain public spaces, so it might help to bring in an agency at this step to handle all these technical details.
The definition of video marketing is not complex. In fact, it’s rather simple: using video to promote or market your brand, product or service. A strong marketing campaign incorporates video into the mix. Customer testimonials, videos from live events, how-to videos, explainer videos, corporate training videos, viral (entertainment) videos — the list goes on.
Before you start filming, set a music budget and research your local copyright laws. Copyright law can be very difficult to decipher, especially when you're dealing with digital content. Bottom line: Most music isn't free. If you use another artist's music without permission or proper licensing, you risk video removal and legal action. In order to avoid copyright infringement, you'll need to find royalty free tunes or pay a composer to create an original score. Royalty free songs aren't free to use; they're quality songs available for a single flat fee. This means you don't have to worry about paying additional licensing fees or royalties in the future. YouTube, Pond5, and PremiumBeat are all great sites to find royalty free music.
Instead, place a laptop below the eye-line of the camera. Break the script into short paragraphs and record it section by section until you capture a great take of each. If you plan in advance when the final video will show b-roll (supplementary footage or screenshots), you can have your talent read those lines directly off the laptop like a voice over.
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