There’s plenty of incentive to try. Videos have been shown to nearly triple ROI over static emails. They open up communication opportunities that words can’t touch, and that even static images can’t beat. The 2014 Online Video Marketing Survey and Trends Report, published by Flimp Video Management, found that 82% of the marketers they surveyed say video email marketing is effective.

Not all corporate videos need to be serious. On the contrary, some humour can work well in generating more interest in your video. Vidyard gives an example of a humorous marketing video that proved hugely successful — a parody by cloud invoicing provider Taulia of the award-winning commercial series ‘Get Rid of Cable’ by Direct TV. As Vidyard writes:
Video really is not only the here and now of marketing but also the future. We’re in place where we can see UCG turn into branded content and kill it on social and, maybe, the next step will be more brands creating marketing videos for VR, AR, and the likes. All this shows us is that mastering video is super important, especially for small businesses. So these tips are super helpful for all of us because the more videos we make the better our marketing results and the better our skills. Luckily, for small brands and companies with the smaller budgets, creating video isn’t out of reach. Between live platforms like Facebook Live and YouTube Live and online tools like wistia.com and slide.ly/promo, it’s getting so much easier to create really high quality videos at any budget size. Gone are the days of spending thousands on video campaigns and so are the days of the big brands getting and staying in the spotlight. I don’t know about you, but I’m excited to see what the smaller, indie brands start to do with their small budgets and all these new(ish) video tools–especially after they read articles with great tips like this one.

Animated gifs are increasingly being classified as videos. Though they are radically stripped down from a true video, it only takes a couple of frames to make an image appear to move. This is one of the tricks to keeping animated gifs both small and engaging – they shouldn’t be much more than six or seven frames. Often three or four frames is the sweet spot. It’s just enough motion to be engaging.
Yet when it comes to online video, specifically on YouTube, people sometimes forget that principle and bring a lot of goals to each video. You want every YouTube video to log a lot of views, gain new subscribers, encourage comments, rank #1 in search, be featured on the home page of Reddit, drive traffic to your website, generate email signups, increase sales, and more. When that’s the case, that video will likely do none of those things well.

Sometimes businesses get so caught up in producing riveting content that they forget to prioritize branding. Sure, you need viewers to enjoy your videos, but they still need to understand the connection between the content and your company. If they don’t see the connection between the topic and your product – or, even worse, aren’t clear on who made the video – then their interest will fizzle out.
This course is for those of you who don’t just want to learn how to get more views but how to convert video views into business sales. You will learn how to create better video marketing campaigns, avoid challenges in using video marketing and implement simple principles to maximize results. This is great for anybody who has a direct online business, entrepreneurs who want to make the most of online videos for branding and sales, advertising and marketing folks who want to deliver ROI and value for their clients. Created by Sorin Constantin who is an Online Entrepreneur and Network Marketing Professional.
For example, if your goal was to boost trust in your business, then you should share videos that provide real value to your audience, such as how-to videos and videos with useful tips, along with video case studies, behind the scenes videos and other similar types of videos that help build trust. Or, if you wanted to boost your social selling, then you’d need to take a different route: more product-related videos showcasing the value of your products or services as well as the benefits they would bring to your target audience.

Molly K. McLaughlin is a New York-based writer and editor with more than a decade of experience covering technology. She has tested and reviewed all sorts of software, mobile apps, and gadgets. Before launching her freelance business, she was an editor at PC Magazine, covering consumer electronics, followed by a stint at ConsumerSearch.com, a revie... See Full Bio
The most underutilized space on YouTube is the description below the video where you can describe your service and put in your URL that can be clicked through. Add a call to action at the end of the video; for example, “If you liked this video, please click through my link below to find more information.” This is a great way to increase engagement. Also add the Annotations feature from YouTube to create links in the videos. This is very powerful.
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