So put aside the idea that email marketing is as outdated as a fax machine, and see what adding some movement to your emails might do. Even if you don’t have extensive resources, the two lighter-weight alternatives to videos are easy to implement. Every email marketer needs to know about what’s possible now. Maybe a few of you will be inspired enough to try just one animated gif.
Next up is building an email newsletter. The best services offer several ways to do this; you can import your own HTML, start from scratch, or use a pre-designed template. Most of these services have drag-and-drop UIs that let you choose exactly the elements you want to include, as well as image libraries in which you can store assets such as your logo or company photos. Tools that let you test your emails for spam are also essential since there are some seemingly innocuous terms that may send up red flags and drop all of your hard work into your subscribers' junk folders or, worse, get your emails banned before they ever reach their recipients.
Keep in mind, too, that many email marketers look at that 58% with a bit of skepticism. The real figure for HTML5 capability probably lies somewhere between the 40% Litmus saw when they mailed and the 58% Email Monks is estimating. And, of course, every list is different, so there's going to be a slight shift in any of these guestimates for your particular list.
Poor audio can also be a quick turn-off for viewers. Be mindful when choosing where to record, making sure to pick a space without chatty employees or loud ambient noises. Lastly, consider investing in a microphone. You want to make sure your camera is picking up a clear and audible recording, but if you aren’t using a microphone it could be more difficult. 
Absolutely! All WeVideo users can edit up to 4K footage in WeVideo. In fact, you can import almost any type of footage and freely mix and match with the more than 600 audio, video, and graphics media formats supported by WeVideo. See the complete list here. Unlimited subscribers can publish their videos in 1080p and 4K Ultra HD at no additional charge. Users with a Flex or Power account can purchase 1080p and 4K publish upgrades on an as-needed basis.
Sending video in email is still a tricky business even though marketers have been trying since the late 1990s. In this post, we’re going to go over some of the ways to get around the difficult issues with sending video in email. It seems fairly obvious that video email marketing will be more common in the future – so we might as well get used to it now!

As you probably know, the most common workaround for embedded videos is to create a “fallback image”. This is a static image that users will see if they can’t view the video. Or you can just make an image that looks like the video, complete with the player controls at the bottom. While I was searching through several thousand emails to find examples for you, it was these static images that just looked like videos that were used 95% of the time.


The other critical component is the marketing of your videos. I have developed relationships by helping other bloggers and webmasters in my niche, who have allowed me to post guest contributions on their websites. This way, a proportion of people who visit another website will visit mine, and a proportion of people who visit my website linked from the guest post will subscribe to my email list, RSS feed, Twitter, YouTube, Digg and Facebook digital assets.
So put aside the idea that email marketing is as outdated as a fax machine, and see what adding some movement to your emails might do. Even if you don’t have extensive resources, the two lighter-weight alternatives to videos are easy to implement. Every email marketer needs to know about what’s possible now. Maybe a few of you will be inspired enough to try just one animated gif.
Bring movie magic to the entire team with one of our group and company-sized solutions. Custom implementation? No problem. WeVideo has hundreds of whitelabel and tailored solutions across the world. Customers include some of the top universities, nonprofits, film institutions, brand name and media companies and even an entire country's education service provider. 

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When looking into descriptions and titles, utilize YouTube’s auto-suggest results. Begin by searching for a specific keyword/term relevant to your video content and you’ll find the most popular search terms are auto-filled. You’ll see long-tail options which can help you determine what you should incorporate into your title and description or even give you ideas for future videos.

Video really is not only the here and now of marketing but also the future. We’re in place where we can see UCG turn into branded content and kill it on social and, maybe, the next step will be more brands creating marketing videos for VR, AR, and the likes. All this shows us is that mastering video is super important, especially for small businesses. So these tips are super helpful for all of us because the more videos we make the better our marketing results and the better our skills. Luckily, for small brands and companies with the smaller budgets, creating video isn’t out of reach. Between live platforms like Facebook Live and YouTube Live and online tools like wistia.com and slide.ly/promo, it’s getting so much easier to create really high quality videos at any budget size. Gone are the days of spending thousands on video campaigns and so are the days of the big brands getting and staying in the spotlight. I don’t know about you, but I’m excited to see what the smaller, indie brands start to do with their small budgets and all these new(ish) video tools–especially after they read articles with great tips like this one.


Michael Clarke, the author of “Social Media Marketing Made Stupidly Easy” has come up with a really simple lesson for everybody wanting to learn Video Marketing. He is a marketer turned entrepreneur who has built 4 profitable companies, where he incidentally uses video as his main method of lead generation and sales. Good ratings all around, this could be the simple course to help you get started. 

Getting started shouldn't be daunting. Generally, you'll know right away whether you like a user interface (UI) or not, and most of the contenders we reviewed offer free trials so you can poke around before dropping any cash. Luckily, most of these services have modern-looking graphics and uncluttered layouts. These are not the complex business software UIs of yesterday. Be careful, though, as some free trials require a credit card. This means you need to be sure to cancel your trial before you're billed if you're not happy with the service.
Each of those tactics requires different tools when it comes to ceation of the source email, dissemination to specific recipients, and integration with other back-end systems, notably the accounting system, the customer relationship management (CRM) system, and possibly even the inventory management system. You can manage your contacts by simply keeping a list of names and email addresses, or you can create a complex database full of subscribers segmented by demographic slices and engagement levels. Which method you choose really just depends on how much of your budget you're willing to allocate towards the email marketing software that can give your company the features it needs.

When looking into descriptions and titles, utilize YouTube’s auto-suggest results. Begin by searching for a specific keyword/term relevant to your video content and you’ll find the most popular search terms are auto-filled. You’ll see long-tail options which can help you determine what you should incorporate into your title and description or even give you ideas for future videos.


Social media has radically expanded the options marketers have when promoting their wares. But at the core of almost every digital marketing campaign, you'll still find email. With a low cost to entry, numerous options to let you tailor a solution for your particular needs, and fantastic engagement numbers when done properly, email remains a marketing favorite.

Yet when it comes to online video, specifically on YouTube, people sometimes forget that principle and bring a lot of goals to each video. You want every YouTube video to log a lot of views, gain new subscribers, encourage comments, rank #1 in search, be featured on the home page of Reddit, drive traffic to your website, generate email signups, increase sales, and more. When that’s the case, that video will likely do none of those things well.
Use Wildcard * search: It prompts the search engine to insert any words in place for it. It may trigger quite unexpected results, help you to brainstorm and even change the initial focus of your research. For example, “how to * hair” will find “How to cut your hair,” “How to curl your hair,” “How to: Avocado Hair Mask Tutorial” and many other interesting tutorials. 

Pam Neely has been marketing online for 15 years. She's a serial entrepreneur and an avid email and content marketing enthusiast with a background in publishing and journalism, including a New York Press Award. Her book "50 Ways to Build Your Email Marketing List" is available on Amazon.com. Pam holds a Master's Degree in Direct and Interactive Marketing from New York University. Follow her on Twitter @pamellaneely.

As you probably know, the most common workaround for embedded videos is to create a “fallback image”. This is a static image that users will see if they can’t view the video. Or you can just make an image that looks like the video, complete with the player controls at the bottom. While I was searching through several thousand emails to find examples for you, it was these static images that just looked like videos that were used 95% of the time.
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