This training created by wizards Phil Ebiner and Michael Moyer has been attended by close to 60,000 people at last count and the attendees have some great things to say about the program. In this 6 hour class, you will learn to make your brand grow, get more views, increase your subscriber base, understand how to make high quality videos and do much more.
Animated gifs are increasingly being classified as videos. Though they are radically stripped down from a true video, it only takes a couple of frames to make an image appear to move. This is one of the tricks to keeping animated gifs both small and engaging – they shouldn’t be much more than six or seven frames. Often three or four frames is the sweet spot. It’s just enough motion to be engaging.
Getting started shouldn't be daunting. Generally, you'll know right away whether you like a user interface (UI) or not, and most of the contenders we reviewed offer free trials so you can poke around before dropping any cash. Luckily, most of these services have modern-looking graphics and uncluttered layouts. These are not the complex business software UIs of yesterday. Be careful, though, as some free trials require a credit card. This means you need to be sure to cancel your trial before you're billed if you're not happy with the service.

Free accounts are limited to five minutes of published video time a month and 1 GB of cloud storage and 480p resolution. All users of paid WeVideo accounts enjoy the ability to publish videos without the WeVideo watermark or bumper, access to a much larger music library, better resolutions and advanced editing features like screen recording and green screen.


Sometimes businesses get so caught up in producing riveting content that they forget to prioritize branding. Sure, you need viewers to enjoy your videos, but they still need to understand the connection between the content and your company. If they don’t see the connection between the topic and your product – or, even worse, aren’t clear on who made the video – then their interest will fizzle out.

One of the foundational pieces of successful video marketing is to avoid going in for the hard sell. Videos can be really effective and fruitful in creating relationships between your leads and your brand, in fact, 90% of users say video is helpful in their decision process. but not if you’re constantly pushing the viewer to buy. (Think cheesy infomercial -- You don’t want to be that guy.)


Michael Clarke, the author of “Social Media Marketing Made Stupidly Easy” has come up with a really simple lesson for everybody wanting to learn Video Marketing. He is a marketer turned entrepreneur who has built 4 profitable companies, where he incidentally uses video as his main method of lead generation and sales. Good ratings all around, this could be the simple course to help you get started.
The most underutilized space on YouTube is the description below the video where you can describe your service and put in your URL that can be clicked through. Add a call to action at the end of the video; for example, “If you liked this video, please click through my link below to find more information.” This is a great way to increase engagement. Also add the Annotations feature from YouTube to create links in the videos. This is very powerful.
Video really is not only the here and now of marketing but also the future. We’re in place where we can see UCG turn into branded content and kill it on social and, maybe, the next step will be more brands creating marketing videos for VR, AR, and the likes. All this shows us is that mastering video is super important, especially for small businesses. So these tips are super helpful for all of us because the more videos we make the better our marketing results and the better our skills. Luckily, for small brands and companies with the smaller budgets, creating video isn’t out of reach. Between live platforms like Facebook Live and YouTube Live and online tools like wistia.com and slide.ly/promo, it’s getting so much easier to create really high quality videos at any budget size. Gone are the days of spending thousands on video campaigns and so are the days of the big brands getting and staying in the spotlight. I don’t know about you, but I’m excited to see what the smaller, indie brands start to do with their small budgets and all these new(ish) video tools–especially after they read articles with great tips like this one.

There’s plenty of incentive to try. Videos have been shown to nearly triple ROI over static emails. They open up communication opportunities that words can’t touch, and that even static images can’t beat. The 2014 Online Video Marketing Survey and Trends Report, published by Flimp Video Management, found that 82% of the marketers they surveyed say video email marketing is effective.


Another good news is that your videos don’t have to be perfect. It’s the content that matters! Latest research shows that users are mostly put off by videos that don’t explain the product or service clearly enough. Low quality and poor design didn’t matter nearly as much. So it’s fair to say that video is like pizza – when it’s bad, it’s still pretty good!
In the last 10 years, the digital landscape has changed significantly. People are phasing out desktop and laptop computers to search the web and interact with content. Instead, they are picking up their mobile phones and tablets. What’s more, digital technology is cheaper today than it’s ever been before; there are virtually no boundaries on how, when and where people can interact with content.
One of the foundational pieces of successful video marketing is to avoid going in for the hard sell. Videos can be really effective and fruitful in creating relationships between your leads and your brand, in fact, 90% of users say video is helpful in their decision process. but not if you’re constantly pushing the viewer to buy. (Think cheesy infomercial -- You don’t want to be that guy.)
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