We recently published an infographic on how powerful video will become. But the future has already arrived. This has been a full-on video revolution year for marketers. According to Wyzowl statistics, 63% of businesses have started using video content marketing. Out of those 82% of businesses feel video marketing is an important part of their strategy. Video is progressing rapidly and will reach new heights sooner than we think. This trend is fueled by 83% of businesses believing that video marketing gives them a good ROI.
If you want to make your animated gifs even smaller, run the individual frames through a tool like Jpegmini. If you use a minimizer like that first (in addition to saving for web in Photoshop, too, of course) it’s often possible to cut the size of an animated gifs down to one third of its original size. That can make the difference between having animated gifs be a viable or unrealistic technique.
Animated gifs are increasingly being classified as videos. Though they are radically stripped down from a true video, it only takes a couple of frames to make an image appear to move. This is one of the tricks to keeping animated gifs both small and engaging – they shouldn’t be much more than six or seven frames. Often three or four frames is the sweet spot. It’s just enough motion to be engaging.
There are endless platforms for video marketing. YouTube, broadcast television, video boards and street marketing, you name it. The possibilities are endless. With a smartphone, consumers can access online video anytime, anywhere. The same is not true with traditional, paper marketing. With video, you can reach your audience wherever they are in a cost-effective way.

Once your thumbnail is ready and placed in your email, link it to the page your video is on. How this is done will depend on what software you’re using, but should be pretty easy (Google is your friend!) You can use a specific landing page or link directly to the platform where your video is hosted (i.e. YouTube, Vimeo, etc.) If you’ve made a video with Biteable, we’ve made it easy for you to post straight to YouTube.


As you probably know, the most common workaround for embedded videos is to create a “fallback image”. This is a static image that users will see if they can’t view the video. Or you can just make an image that looks like the video, complete with the player controls at the bottom. While I was searching through several thousand emails to find examples for you, it was these static images that just looked like videos that were used 95% of the time.
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