Some email marketers have also used "video gifs" as fallbacks for HTML5 videos. Unfortunately, while these will play on most email clients, the images are huge (think megabytes, not kb). The image quality is also fairly low, which is why while a few retailers tried these around 2008/2009, they’re rarely seen now. Other marketers have had some success with embedding YouTube videos in Gmail, but that's not a widely used tactic anymore.

There are a lot of fantastic points in this article. Video is absolutely the way to go because of just how engaging it is with customers. But when dealing with mobile there are a couple things that you need to make sure you are doing. You need to capture their attention early since attention span on mobile (especially on apps like Facebook) is pretty low. Design the video for sound-off viewing with things like subtitles. Have a clear call to action at the end of your video. The last thing is to plan for vertical viewing since “people are 67% more likely to watch the full length of square videos than they are to watch horizontal ones.” (source: https://sundaysky.com/blog/5-mobile-video-best-practices/ )


Free accounts are limited to five minutes of published video time a month and 1 GB of cloud storage and 480p resolution. All users of paid WeVideo accounts enjoy the ability to publish videos without the WeVideo watermark or bumper, access to a much larger music library, better resolutions and advanced editing features like screen recording and green screen.
There are endless platforms for video marketing. YouTube, broadcast television, video boards and street marketing, you name it. The possibilities are endless. With a smartphone, consumers can access online video anytime, anywhere. The same is not true with traditional, paper marketing. With video, you can reach your audience wherever they are in a cost-effective way.
Lighting can also be a game-changer. Use natural light whenever possible, but if not, consider using direct lamps to provide optimal lighting for the person or object you’re filming. This will help you control shadows and contrast. On the other hand, using basic three-point lighting will help give your subject more dimension and overall make your video quality look more professional.
Every WeVideo account, including free accounts, features a remarkable suite of creative features including Picture-in-Picture and the ability to use your own music, all at no charge. When you upgrade to a premium plan, you gain significantly more publishing time and cloud storage, support for higher resolution video, as well as access to a huge list of additional features such as green screen, slow motion controls, broadcast-quality motion titles, screen recording, and an expanded library of license-free music. More details are available here.
However, in a social media context, video marketers must remember that people share emotions, not facts. 76% of users say they would share a branded video with their friends if it was entertaining. So create fun entertaining videos to encourage social shares. Emotions are not exactly ROI but social shares can increase traffic to your site, and you can take it from there.
There are endless platforms for video marketing. YouTube, broadcast television, video boards and street marketing, you name it. The possibilities are endless. With a smartphone, consumers can access online video anytime, anywhere. The same is not true with traditional, paper marketing. With video, you can reach your audience wherever they are in a cost-effective way.
Getting started shouldn't be daunting. Generally, you'll know right away whether you like a user interface (UI) or not, and most of the contenders we reviewed offer free trials so you can poke around before dropping any cash. Luckily, most of these services have modern-looking graphics and uncluttered layouts. These are not the complex business software UIs of yesterday. Be careful, though, as some free trials require a credit card. This means you need to be sure to cancel your trial before you're billed if you're not happy with the service.
Sending video in email is still a tricky business even though marketers have been trying since the late 1990s. In this post, we’re going to go over some of the ways to get around the difficult issues with sending video in email. It seems fairly obvious that video email marketing will be more common in the future – so we might as well get used to it now!

As you are probably aware, Facebook has made a huge push into video recently. There’s a lot of research that shows uploading videos directly to Facebook as posts (instead of embedding YouTube videos in posts) can dramatically improve organic reach of video posts. As a result, smart Facebook marketers are now uploading all their videos to Facebook directly. It’s been working so well that as of October of last year, there were actually more video views on Facebook than on YouTube! You can boost your Facebook engagement simply by doing some cross-channel marketing and reaching out to email subscribers who haven’t seen the cool new videos now available on your Facebook page. And an embedded video, a static image that looks like a video, or an animated gif that’s a montage of different videos are all great ways to get more eyeballs on your Facebook videos.


Also, even if HTML5 videos can be viewed by more and more email users, there’s still going to be a significant group of users who can’t view embedded videos. Hopefully in a few years this group will be less than 10% for users, but we have to do our email marketing with the technology we have now. Because of that, we need to create an alternative for everyone who can’t see the videos. Fortunately, there's a great alternative to embedded videos. It's been widely tested, too.
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