Some email marketers have also used "video gifs" as fallbacks for HTML5 videos. Unfortunately, while these will play on most email clients, the images are huge (think megabytes, not kb). The image quality is also fairly low, which is why while a few retailers tried these around 2008/2009, they’re rarely seen now. Other marketers have had some success with embedding YouTube videos in Gmail, but that's not a widely used tactic anymore.
The most underutilized space on YouTube is the description below the video where you can describe your service and put in your URL that can be clicked through. Add a call to action at the end of the video; for example, “If you liked this video, please click through my link below to find more information.” This is a great way to increase engagement. Also add the Annotations feature from YouTube to create links in the videos. This is very powerful.
To learn more about how video marketing can help convert customers and increase engagement with your brand, check out the infographic below from Vidyard (and for even more information, check out its Video in Business Benchmark Report). It breaks down 16 compelling video marketing statistics in the context of viewing platforms, distribution channels, business video consumption habits, and more.
Every WeVideo account, including free accounts, features a remarkable suite of creative features including Picture-in-Picture and the ability to use your own music, all at no charge. When you upgrade to a premium plan, you gain significantly more publishing time and cloud storage, support for higher resolution video, as well as access to a huge list of additional features such as green screen, slow motion controls, broadcast-quality motion titles, screen recording, and an expanded library of license-free music. More details are available here.
Did you know that 65% of your audience are visual learners? One of the most powerful methods you can use for video marketing is to educate your audience. And the great thing is that education comes in many forms. For example, you can teach your customers how to use your product or service and provide useful tips on how to make the most of it. Or you can create a webinar to showcase your industry knowledge, position your brand as a thought leader, add value to your consumers’ lives and collect leads in the process.

Use Wildcard * search: It prompts the search engine to insert any words in place for it. It may trigger quite unexpected results, help you to brainstorm and even change the initial focus of your research. For example, “how to * hair” will find “How to cut your hair,” “How to curl your hair,” “How to: Avocado Hair Mask Tutorial” and many other interesting tutorials.
Words spoken with clarity and professionalism will always come out better in a corporate video than an amateur speaker, whose lack of experience speaking on the camera is obvious. With this in mind, it might be a good idea to have an employee that is experienced on speaking in front of the camera record for the video, or even think about calling in a professional.
As you probably know, the most common workaround for embedded videos is to create a “fallback image”. This is a static image that users will see if they can’t view the video. Or you can just make an image that looks like the video, complete with the player controls at the bottom. While I was searching through several thousand emails to find examples for you, it was these static images that just looked like videos that were used 95% of the time.
Also, even if HTML5 videos can be viewed by more and more email users, there’s still going to be a significant group of users who can’t view embedded videos. Hopefully in a few years this group will be less than 10% for users, but we have to do our email marketing with the technology we have now. Because of that, we need to create an alternative for everyone who can’t see the videos. Fortunately, there's a great alternative to embedded videos. It's been widely tested, too.
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