Wave.video is one of my favourite video creators for several reasons: the platform is super intuitive and easy to use, it has a huge library of free and paid video clips and images (although it’s worth mentioning you can upload your own too), it supports over 30 different formats (and you can easily change between formats) and it has a great selection of ready-made video templates for all kinds of occasions:
When you are done editing your video, the next step is to “publish—our way of saying combine all the elements of your movie into a final MP4 file—at the resolution you want, so that you can share it anywhere. Publish time is the duration of your published videos. Look to the plan comparison chart on total available publish time per plan. For example, 1 hour per month will allow you to publish 20 videos that are each three minutes long, 12 videos that are each five minutes long, or any other combination that adds up to your total available publish time. Publish time is not affected by the amount of time you can spend working in the editor and/or the duration of your media assets. More information is available here.

Yet when it comes to online video, specifically on YouTube, people sometimes forget that principle and bring a lot of goals to each video. You want every YouTube video to log a lot of views, gain new subscribers, encourage comments, rank #1 in search, be featured on the home page of Reddit, drive traffic to your website, generate email signups, increase sales, and more. When that’s the case, that video will likely do none of those things well.


Poor audio can also be a quick turn-off for viewers. Be mindful when choosing where to record, making sure to pick a space without chatty employees or loud ambient noises. Lastly, consider investing in a microphone. You want to make sure your camera is picking up a clear and audible recording, but if you aren’t using a microphone it could be more difficult. 
If you can explain a new feature with an animated gif, you could send them in customer support emails to explain how to solve customers’ most common problems. Some SAAS companies actually give all their customer service people access to the screen capture app Jing. When a customer has a problem, the customer service people just make a 1-2 minute video explaining how to do what the customer wants. They send the video. This saves writing long explanations, and is more helpful to the customers.
So put aside the idea that email marketing is as outdated as a fax machine, and see what adding some movement to your emails might do. Even if you don’t have extensive resources, the two lighter-weight alternatives to videos are easy to implement. Every email marketer needs to know about what’s possible now. Maybe a few of you will be inspired enough to try just one animated gif.

Wave.video is one of my favourite video creators for several reasons: the platform is super intuitive and easy to use, it has a huge library of free and paid video clips and images (although it’s worth mentioning you can upload your own too), it supports over 30 different formats (and you can easily change between formats) and it has a great selection of ready-made video templates for all kinds of occasions:
Not all corporate videos need to be serious. On the contrary, some humour can work well in generating more interest in your video. Vidyard gives an example of a humorous marketing video that proved hugely successful — a parody by cloud invoicing provider Taulia of the award-winning commercial series ‘Get Rid of Cable’ by Direct TV. As Vidyard writes:
So what's the take-away here? It’s probably still a year or more until HTML5 video in emails is more widely used. Some of the bravest email marketers might leap in now, like Chanel did with this HTML5 email that StyleCampaign created, but those will be the exception. Again, what really matters for your results is which email clients your list uses most. It’s a good idea to check your email analytics to see which email clients your subscribers use. Who knows, you might actually see an opportunity for some video testing.
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