Search engines can’t digest every word of your video like the human ear, but that doesn’t mean you can’t optimize your video for search engines. Whether you’re deciding on the name of your video or the description, think about what search terms you want to get found under; what people would be searching for when they come across this particular video - just as you would when writing a blog article

Similar to how all blog posts and content should have a call to action at the end, which invites the reader to take further action, such as signing up to a newsletter, or visiting a website, so too should a marketing video. Ask yourself, what do you want viewers to do when they’ve watched the video and then encourage them to do so without being overtly salesy.
When looking into descriptions and titles, utilize YouTube’s auto-suggest results. Begin by searching for a specific keyword/term relevant to your video content and you’ll find the most popular search terms are auto-filled. You’ll see long-tail options which can help you determine what you should incorporate into your title and description or even give you ideas for future videos.
So put aside the idea that email marketing is as outdated as a fax machine, and see what adding some movement to your emails might do. Even if you don’t have extensive resources, the two lighter-weight alternatives to videos are easy to implement. Every email marketer needs to know about what’s possible now. Maybe a few of you will be inspired enough to try just one animated gif.

Trust is the foundation of conversions and sales. But building trust should be a goal on its own. The whole concept of content marketing is based on trust and creating long-term relationships. Stop selling and let the people come to you by providing them interesting and useful information. I couldn’t have said it better than Mark Schaefer, the Executive Director of Schaefer Marketing Solutions:
As Kirsty Deeble-Rogers of D-R Ads tells us, “People often spend too much time worrying about creating different content for each platform. It’s true that square videos work better on Facebook and portrait videos are better for Instagram but that doesn’t mean each platform needs difference content, just reformat your Facebook posts to work on Instagram, Twitter, etc.”

The solution to this is twofold. Add captions to every video you upload and make sure your visual content is eye-catching and appeals to your audience without relying on audio. To illustrate, if your video is for surfers, setting it on the beach with surfers in the background will instantly make it more appealing to that audience as they scroll through the feed.

Be sure to look at the tech support offered by each of these companies, as we felt many weren't as available as we would have liked. You'll find that some offer 24/7 phone support, live chat, and email help, while others leave you to rely on online documentation and limited live support hours. The best services offer a combination of self-serve help resources—where you can search FAQs and articles to find your own answers—as well as live support via chat or phone when you can't solve an issue yourself. We cover all of these concerns in our reviews, plus you can get an overview in the feature chart above.
The other critical component is the marketing of your videos. I have developed relationships by helping other bloggers and webmasters in my niche, who have allowed me to post guest contributions on their websites. This way, a proportion of people who visit another website will visit mine, and a proportion of people who visit my website linked from the guest post will subscribe to my email list, RSS feed, Twitter, YouTube, Digg and Facebook digital assets.
Yet when it comes to online video, specifically on YouTube, people sometimes forget that principle and bring a lot of goals to each video. You want every YouTube video to log a lot of views, gain new subscribers, encourage comments, rank #1 in search, be featured on the home page of Reddit, drive traffic to your website, generate email signups, increase sales, and more. When that’s the case, that video will likely do none of those things well.
On the surface, the how of video marketing is pretty simple: Your brand creates videos that, in some way or another, promote your company, drive sales, raise awareness of your products or services, or engage your customers. In practice, it’s a little more complicated. Like many of your marketing efforts, video marketing is data driven, so you’ll want to monitor various metrics and track customer engagement.
As you probably know, the most common workaround for embedded videos is to create a “fallback image”. This is a static image that users will see if they can’t view the video. Or you can just make an image that looks like the video, complete with the player controls at the bottom. While I was searching through several thousand emails to find examples for you, it was these static images that just looked like videos that were used 95% of the time. 

This training created by wizards Phil Ebiner and Michael Moyer has been attended by close to 60,000 people at last count and the attendees have some great things to say about the program. In this 6 hour class, you will learn to make your brand grow, get more views, increase your subscriber base, understand how to make high quality videos and do much more.


The most advanced email marketing services offer custom workflows where you can specify triggers based on actions (such as opening an email or making a purchase) or on inaction (such as ignoring emails). With these services, you can also set up a series of emails (such as tutorials) to be sent to segments of users, and you can pause or stop a campaign at any time. You can also move contacts into new segments once they have completed tutorials.

So put aside the idea that email marketing is as outdated as a fax machine, and see what adding some movement to your emails might do. Even if you don’t have extensive resources, the two lighter-weight alternatives to videos are easy to implement. Every email marketer needs to know about what’s possible now. Maybe a few of you will be inspired enough to try just one animated gif.
Pam Neely has been marketing online for 15 years. She's a serial entrepreneur and an avid email and content marketing enthusiast with a background in publishing and journalism, including a New York Press Award. Her book "50 Ways to Build Your Email Marketing List" is available on Amazon.com. Pam holds a Master's Degree in Direct and Interactive Marketing from New York University. Follow her on Twitter @pamellaneely.
So put aside the idea that email marketing is as outdated as a fax machine, and see what adding some movement to your emails might do. Even if you don’t have extensive resources, the two lighter-weight alternatives to videos are easy to implement. Every email marketer needs to know about what’s possible now. Maybe a few of you will be inspired enough to try just one animated gif.
Yes. Experian has reported that 72% of their clients who have used animated Gif’s or cinemagraphs in emails see higher transaction-to-click rates. And last year Dell saw a 109% lift in revenue when it tested an animated gif campaign. Nobody stats are as good as Helzberg Diamonds when it comes to animated gifs. They paired up this technique with personalization and saw a 288% lift. This particular email has become the gold standard (ahem) of what’s possible: 

Once your thumbnail is ready and placed in your email, link it to the page your video is on. How this is done will depend on what software you’re using, but should be pretty easy (Google is your friend!) You can use a specific landing page or link directly to the platform where your video is hosted (i.e. YouTube, Vimeo, etc.) If you’ve made a video with Biteable, we’ve made it easy for you to post straight to YouTube.

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