As you probably know, the most common workaround for embedded videos is to create a “fallback image”. This is a static image that users will see if they can’t view the video. Or you can just make an image that looks like the video, complete with the player controls at the bottom. While I was searching through several thousand emails to find examples for you, it was these static images that just looked like videos that were used 95% of the time.
There are endless platforms for video marketing. YouTube, broadcast television, video boards and street marketing, you name it. The possibilities are endless. With a smartphone, consumers can access online video anytime, anywhere. The same is not true with traditional, paper marketing. With video, you can reach your audience wherever they are in a cost-effective way.

Michael Clarke, the author of “Social Media Marketing Made Stupidly Easy” has come up with a really simple lesson for everybody wanting to learn Video Marketing. He is a marketer turned entrepreneur who has built 4 profitable companies, where he incidentally uses video as his main method of lead generation and sales. Good ratings all around, this could be the simple course to help you get started.
So put aside the idea that email marketing is as outdated as a fax machine, and see what adding some movement to your emails might do. Even if you don’t have extensive resources, the two lighter-weight alternatives to videos are easy to implement. Every email marketer needs to know about what’s possible now. Maybe a few of you will be inspired enough to try just one animated gif.
Yes, you read that title correctly. That out of their minds, slightly alcoholic team over at Epic Meal Time were the first to teach me about YouTube marketing. As with all successful YouTube channels, they had to build their own channel themselves. There was no network backing them or an executive producer coming on board to show them the ropes. There wasn’t even anyone with any real experience!
As you probably know, the most common workaround for embedded videos is to create a “fallback image”. This is a static image that users will see if they can’t view the video. Or you can just make an image that looks like the video, complete with the player controls at the bottom. While I was searching through several thousand emails to find examples for you, it was these static images that just looked like videos that were used 95% of the time.
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