Will you publish a miniseries about wine-making as you start your own micro-vineyard on YouTube? Users publish over 300 hours of video content hourly on the platform — often hailed as the granddaddy of video platforms. However, Facebook is on the rise with its video streaming. Remember that 49 percent of consumers connect with video streaming on Facebook.
If there’s one thing that entices everybody when it comes to video, it’s YouTube views. What better than start off with this course about YouTube marketing to get 1 million views! Created by Alex Genadinik, this Bestselling Course has been taken up by 3,500+ students and has an awesome rating of 4.7 out of 5. So for all those looking forward to building a strong & successful YouTube channel, getting a lot of views and eventually monetise it to earn money via YouTube, this course could be the best for you.
To make your videos as memorable as possible, ensure that you’re keeping them in line with your brand strategy. This means keeping colors, fonts, logos and voice the same in your video marketing as they are in your blogs and articles. While videos do things text content doesn’t, users should still be able to recognize the style and format of your brand’s videos online.

So put aside the idea that email marketing is as outdated as a fax machine, and see what adding some movement to your emails might do. Even if you don’t have extensive resources, the two lighter-weight alternatives to videos are easy to implement. Every email marketer needs to know about what’s possible now. Maybe a few of you will be inspired enough to try just one animated gif.
If you can explain a new feature with an animated gif, you could send them in customer support emails to explain how to solve customers’ most common problems. Some SAAS companies actually give all their customer service people access to the screen capture app Jing. When a customer has a problem, the customer service people just make a 1-2 minute video explaining how to do what the customer wants. They send the video. This saves writing long explanations, and is more helpful to the customers.
And that leads us right into understanding service pricing and packaging. The email marketing services we reviewed range from about $5 per month to as much as $20 per month for a range of features. Many email marketing plans include unlimited email sends each month and bill you based on the number of subscribers. If you have a small list, then look for a company that offers a free plan, a low-cost plan for several hundred subscribers, or even a pay-as-you-go plan. On the flip side, many of these services also offer high-volume plans with up to 100,000 or more contacts. Sometimes this requires a custom plan that has to be arranged directly with a sales rep. If you're willing to commit, then look for the companies that offer discounts if you pay yearly rather than monthly. A few offer also money-back guarantees.

Video advertising is becoming more and more affordable and widespread. Video adoption grows partly because advances in technology but also because it’s easy to spread across the globe. Making marketing videos for your business requires creativity and knowledge of human psychology. The cocktail of these components makes it possible to create real miracles of advertising at minimal cost.
As you probably know, the most common workaround for embedded videos is to create a “fallback image”. This is a static image that users will see if they can’t view the video. Or you can just make an image that looks like the video, complete with the player controls at the bottom. While I was searching through several thousand emails to find examples for you, it was these static images that just looked like videos that were used 95% of the time.
Some email marketers have also used "video gifs" as fallbacks for HTML5 videos. Unfortunately, while these will play on most email clients, the images are huge (think megabytes, not kb). The image quality is also fairly low, which is why while a few retailers tried these around 2008/2009, they’re rarely seen now. Other marketers have had some success with embedding YouTube videos in Gmail, but that's not a widely used tactic anymore.
These classes on video marketing will help you to learn the skills to take the first steps as a vlogger. Learn to write, film and create engaging content for your videos along with tips and advice from the instructors. The lectures have been designed to be concise and time efficient. Along with the basics of vlogging, there are courses that focus on animated storytelling in after effect among the many other techniques covered. By the end of the class, you will be proficient in the foundations of video creation and related skills.

Getting started shouldn't be daunting. Generally, you'll know right away whether you like a user interface (UI) or not, and most of the contenders we reviewed offer free trials so you can poke around before dropping any cash. Luckily, most of these services have modern-looking graphics and uncluttered layouts. These are not the complex business software UIs of yesterday. Be careful, though, as some free trials require a credit card. This means you need to be sure to cancel your trial before you're billed if you're not happy with the service.
Creating strong video content for your business is a good way to reach a variety of markets and engage your audience. As the founder of a company that produces video content for some larger-than-life brands (ranging from RedBull to Coca-Cola), I can tell you that video is a very effective marketing tool when done well. However, more often than not, the videos I see startups and small businesses producing are done so poorly that they often end up doing more harm than good.
One of the foundational pieces of successful video marketing is to avoid going in for the hard sell. Videos can be really effective and fruitful in creating relationships between your leads and your brand, in fact, 90% of users say video is helpful in their decision process. but not if you’re constantly pushing the viewer to buy. (Think cheesy infomercial -- You don’t want to be that guy.)
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