Beyond optimization of the video itself, video content is a key component that can be used to support other on-page optimization efforts. For example, you can use video content to provide a second option for consuming content on a page. This is a smart method for increasing user time on a page, which has a direct correlation to the ranking of your content.
.GIFs are effective for images with simple graphics, limited colors, text images (like logos), etc. .GIFs usually are limited to 256 colors. But, it supports animation, so it is good for email design. Also, these files can be compressed into a smaller file size. Animated .GIFs do not support animation the way Flash files do, but allow you to add movement without much programming or coding. You can use jQuery to generate animated effects.
It never hurts to review your past strategies before the new year. As you review all your marketing efforts and make plans for 2019, you can keep this list in mind! It’s going to be important to avoid these video marketing mistakes to stay ahead of your competition. If you’re planning to start video marketing this upcoming year, this will help give you ideas and steer you away from common errors.
Today, one of the biggest trends driving the digital marketing world is responsive design. When a company’s content doesn’t perform well on a given device or browser system, the business behind it loses traffic and suffers decreased conversions as a result. Fortunately, video content is fit for consumption on all devices, ranging from computers to mobile phones. This expands video’s reach and makes it more user-friendly and consumer-focused.
Creating strong video content for your business is a good way to reach a variety of markets and engage your audience. As the founder of a company that produces video content for some larger-than-life brands (ranging from RedBull to Coca-Cola), I can tell you that video is a very effective marketing tool when done well. However, more often than not, the videos I see startups and small businesses producing are done so poorly that they often end up doing more harm than good.
A team of 30+ global YouTube and Marketing experts have compiled this list of Best YouTube and Video Marketing Course, Training, Classes & Certification available online for 2019. These resources will help you excel at Video Marketing, and are suitable for beginners, intermediate learners as well as experts. 8,000+ professionals have already benefited from this compilation.

To learn more about how video marketing can help convert customers and increase engagement with your brand, check out the infographic below from Vidyard (and for even more information, check out its Video in Business Benchmark Report). It breaks down 16 compelling video marketing statistics in the context of viewing platforms, distribution channels, business video consumption habits, and more.
Sending video in email is still a tricky business even though marketers have been trying since the late 1990s. In this post, we’re going to go over some of the ways to get around the difficult issues with sending video in email. It seems fairly obvious that video email marketing will be more common in the future – so we might as well get used to it now!
Yes. Experian has reported that 72% of their clients who have used animated Gif’s or cinemagraphs in emails see higher transaction-to-click rates. And last year Dell saw a 109% lift in revenue when it tested an animated gif campaign. Nobody stats are as good as Helzberg Diamonds when it comes to animated gifs. They paired up this technique with personalization and saw a 288% lift. This particular email has become the gold standard (ahem) of what’s possible:
Another good news is that your videos don’t have to be perfect. It’s the content that matters! Latest research shows that users are mostly put off by videos that don’t explain the product or service clearly enough. Low quality and poor design didn’t matter nearly as much. So it’s fair to say that video is like pizza – when it’s bad, it’s still pretty good!
Pam Neely has been marketing online for 15 years. She's a serial entrepreneur and an avid email and content marketing enthusiast with a background in publishing and journalism, including a New York Press Award. Her book "50 Ways to Build Your Email Marketing List" is available on Amazon.com. Pam holds a Master's Degree in Direct and Interactive Marketing from New York University. Follow her on Twitter @pamellaneely.
Bottom line, overall strategy and data should drive your video marketing strategy. First, plan a solid strategy to develop video(s) for each level of your sales funnel. Outline the content and goals of each individual video. Determine what metrics will best determine a video’s success. Then, test. Analyze. Tweak your videos (and their deployment), when necessary. Work to make them more effective. And whatever you do, do do video; in 2017 and beyond, it’s the cornerstone of your brand’s marketing efforts.
As a growing business, you may also be looking for a CRM solution, and you'll find that the more advanced email marketing services have begun to crossover into CRM. It makes sense: Both types of software deal with managing and communicating with customers. A handful of these services are one-stop shops, either offering both email marketing and CRM out of the box or as add-on services.
Many consultants are getting conversion rates of 20% or higher by sending completely customized, highly crafted cold emails to just the right prospect. While copy is always the safe choice, a personal, videotaped message (even if it was sent as a static image that lead to the landing page with the actual video), might be just the thing to break through an executive’s filter and to really get their attention.
Molly K. McLaughlin is a New York-based writer and editor with more than a decade of experience covering technology. She has tested and reviewed all sorts of software, mobile apps, and gadgets. Before launching her freelance business, she was an editor at PC Magazine, covering consumer electronics, followed by a stint at ConsumerSearch.com, a revie... See Full Bio
Creating strong video content for your business is a good way to reach a variety of markets and engage your audience. As the founder of a company that produces video content for some larger-than-life brands (ranging from RedBull to Coca-Cola), I can tell you that video is a very effective marketing tool when done well. However, more often than not, the videos I see startups and small businesses producing are done so poorly that they often end up doing more harm than good.
Yes, you read that title correctly. That out of their minds, slightly alcoholic team over at Epic Meal Time were the first to teach me about YouTube marketing. As with all successful YouTube channels, they had to build their own channel themselves. There was no network backing them or an executive producer coming on board to show them the ropes. There wasn’t even anyone with any real experience!
Will you publish a miniseries about wine-making as you start your own micro-vineyard on YouTube? Users publish over 300 hours of video content hourly on the platform — often hailed as the granddaddy of video platforms. However, Facebook is on the rise with its video streaming. Remember that 49 percent of consumers connect with video streaming on Facebook.
There are endless platforms for video marketing. YouTube, broadcast television, video boards and street marketing, you name it. The possibilities are endless. With a smartphone, consumers can access online video anytime, anywhere. The same is not true with traditional, paper marketing. With video, you can reach your audience wherever they are in a cost-effective way.
On the surface, the how of video marketing is pretty simple: Your brand creates videos that, in some way or another, promote your company, drive sales, raise awareness of your products or services, or engage your customers. In practice, it’s a little more complicated. Like many of your marketing efforts, video marketing is data driven, so you’ll want to monitor various metrics and track customer engagement.
A little like how we are unlikely to click on an email if we’re not inspired by the subject line, an incredible one fifth of viewers click off a video within 10 seconds if they’re not interested in what they see. With this in mind, the introduction of the video is vitally important and should be made inspiring, entertaining and informative, to hook the viewer and encourage them to view the whole of the video.
In the last 10 years, the digital landscape has changed significantly. People are phasing out desktop and laptop computers to search the web and interact with content. Instead, they are picking up their mobile phones and tablets. What’s more, digital technology is cheaper today than it’s ever been before; there are virtually no boundaries on how, when and where people can interact with content.
The popularity of video also means that more content at the top of the funnel has to be in video format. In B2C it’s almost obvious. But B2B-people are people, too. Video content is more likely to keep the audience in the comfort zone, and they will not engage in system 2 thinking. System 1 autopilot mental state should lead to less critical thinking, less friction, and more conversions.
Molly K. McLaughlin is a New York-based writer and editor with more than a decade of experience covering technology. She has tested and reviewed all sorts of software, mobile apps, and gadgets. Before launching her freelance business, she was an editor at PC Magazine, covering consumer electronics, followed by a stint at ConsumerSearch.com, a revie... See Full Bio 

A general video merges tag appears as *|YOUTUBE: [$vid=XXX] |* for YouTube and *|VIMEO: [$vid=XXX] |* for Vimeo. Here, XXX represents the ID placed at the end of the URL of the particular video. For example: Use nS5N08BNvXU in place of XXX for http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nS5N08BNvXU. So, finally the video merge tag becomes *|YOUTUBE: [$vid= nS5N08BNvXU] |*
Yes, you read that title correctly. That out of their minds, slightly alcoholic team over at Epic Meal Time were the first to teach me about YouTube marketing. As with all successful YouTube channels, they had to build their own channel themselves. There was no network backing them or an executive producer coming on board to show them the ropes. There wasn’t even anyone with any real experience!
In this YouTube Course, you will explore how to replicate your customer experience online and build your community. Along with this, you will learn how to chalk out videos based on your brand and business. As planning the content is a crucial part of the complete process, therefore, there are specific lectures focusing on planning along with short samples for better understanding. Last but not the least you will learn to be yourself and become comfortable in front of the camera.
Many consultants are getting conversion rates of 20% or higher by sending completely customized, highly crafted cold emails to just the right prospect. While copy is always the safe choice, a personal, videotaped message (even if it was sent as a static image that lead to the landing page with the actual video), might be just the thing to break through an executive’s filter and to really get their attention.
Video really is not only the here and now of marketing but also the future. We’re in place where we can see UCG turn into branded content and kill it on social and, maybe, the next step will be more brands creating marketing videos for VR, AR, and the likes. All this shows us is that mastering video is super important, especially for small businesses. So these tips are super helpful for all of us because the more videos we make the better our marketing results and the better our skills. Luckily, for small brands and companies with the smaller budgets, creating video isn’t out of reach. Between live platforms like Facebook Live and YouTube Live and online tools like wistia.com and slide.ly/promo, it’s getting so much easier to create really high quality videos at any budget size. Gone are the days of spending thousands on video campaigns and so are the days of the big brands getting and staying in the spotlight. I don’t know about you, but I’m excited to see what the smaller, indie brands start to do with their small budgets and all these new(ish) video tools–especially after they read articles with great tips like this one.
Next up is building an email newsletter. The best services offer several ways to do this; you can import your own HTML, start from scratch, or use a pre-designed template. Most of these services have drag-and-drop UIs that let you choose exactly the elements you want to include, as well as image libraries in which you can store assets such as your logo or company photos. Tools that let you test your emails for spam are also essential since there are some seemingly innocuous terms that may send up red flags and drop all of your hard work into your subscribers' junk folders or, worse, get your emails banned before they ever reach their recipients. 

Liis, I couldn’t agree more with everything you say here. It’s such a motivating stuff . I can’t believe how far video has come since the early YouTube days. Social video is now such an important tool to modern marketing that my clients keep asking for more. The results really speak for themselves. I also love how more and more tools pop up (like slide.ly/promo and wevideo.com) to help make videos more accessible and possible for brands and companies of all sizes, not just the big brands. It’s been an interesting journey watching video grow up until now, but, I can’t wait to see what the future of video marketing will look like.


In the last 10 years, the digital landscape has changed significantly. People are phasing out desktop and laptop computers to search the web and interact with content. Instead, they are picking up their mobile phones and tablets. What’s more, digital technology is cheaper today than it’s ever been before; there are virtually no boundaries on how, when and where people can interact with content.
A little like how we are unlikely to click on an email if we’re not inspired by the subject line, an incredible one fifth of viewers click off a video within 10 seconds if they’re not interested in what they see. With this in mind, the introduction of the video is vitally important and should be made inspiring, entertaining and informative, to hook the viewer and encourage them to view the whole of the video.
To learn more about how video marketing can help convert customers and increase engagement with your brand, check out the infographic below from Vidyard (and for even more information, check out its Video in Business Benchmark Report). It breaks down 16 compelling video marketing statistics in the context of viewing platforms, distribution channels, business video consumption habits, and more.
Sometimes businesses get so caught up in producing riveting content that they forget to prioritize branding. Sure, you need viewers to enjoy your videos, but they still need to understand the connection between the content and your company. If they don’t see the connection between the topic and your product – or, even worse, aren’t clear on who made the video – then their interest will fizzle out.
As you probably know, the most common workaround for embedded videos is to create a “fallback image”. This is a static image that users will see if they can’t view the video. Or you can just make an image that looks like the video, complete with the player controls at the bottom. While I was searching through several thousand emails to find examples for you, it was these static images that just looked like videos that were used 95% of the time.
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