From these challenges, rise video marketing best practices. And it all comes down to strategy: If you want your video marketing to have results, then you must plan, test, analyze, and test again. Yes, the goal of your videos is to tell a story and engage your customers but, from a marketing perspective, your videos must also align to your sales funnel. What is the purpose of each video? Who is the audience? How does the video further your marketing goals?
So put aside the idea that email marketing is as outdated as a fax machine, and see what adding some movement to your emails might do. Even if you don’t have extensive resources, the two lighter-weight alternatives to videos are easy to implement. Every email marketer needs to know about what’s possible now. Maybe a few of you will be inspired enough to try just one animated gif.
Animated gifs are increasingly being classified as videos. Though they are radically stripped down from a true video, it only takes a couple of frames to make an image appear to move. This is one of the tricks to keeping animated gifs both small and engaging – they shouldn’t be much more than six or seven frames. Often three or four frames is the sweet spot. It’s just enough motion to be engaging.

When looking into descriptions and titles, utilize YouTube’s auto-suggest results. Begin by searching for a specific keyword/term relevant to your video content and you’ll find the most popular search terms are auto-filled. You’ll see long-tail options which can help you determine what you should incorporate into your title and description or even give you ideas for future videos.

Shoot impromptu, personal videos to spark deeper engagement on your Facebook fan page. Keep the videos short in length (under 90 seconds) and don’t worry about getting it perfect. Usually the first take is just fine! When you look into the lens of the camera and you talk directly to your fans as if you’re in a room with them, this creates more intimacy and connection and builds better relationships with your fans.


The definition of video marketing is not complex. In fact, it’s rather simple: using video to promote or market your brand, product or service. A strong marketing campaign incorporates video into the mix. Customer testimonials, videos from live events, how-to videos, explainer videos, corporate training videos, viral (entertainment) videos — the list goes on.
By creating information-dense, accessible, easy-to-interact-with video content, brands can develop a substantial online following and promote customer recall. For an example of a company that’s done this particularly well, consider Headspace, a meditation app that became a $250 million business. The app offers multiple levels of meditation, employing gamification to increase engagement. Users must complete and master each meditation level before advancing. Most sessions are in video format, beautifully crafted with illustrations and layouts true to the brand. It is elegant, consistent and engaging, heavily relying on video.

This training program is for the ones who don’t just want organic traffic and views for their videos but want to spend some money to reach people across the world in a targeted manner. Advertising your videos can be really impactful when you want to generate lot of revenue and positive ROI from it. This program will help you set up an ad from scratch, optimise it to reach the relevant audience, how to make your paid views also earn you earned views organically and finally how to draw visitors from these videos to your money pages / landing pages where you can generate revenue.
Jide Alufa of Sophiads explains, “Many businesses create videos and launch them giving their audience the barn and the kitchen sink of information on their services which can be overwhelming. During your first videos, it’s important to teach the what, not the how. Here are some questions you can ask yourself to get you started: What is your service? What is it about? What does it do for your customers? What is the end result? What happened to others who used your service?”
This training program is for the ones who don’t just want organic traffic and views for their videos but want to spend some money to reach people across the world in a targeted manner. Advertising your videos can be really impactful when you want to generate lot of revenue and positive ROI from it. This program will help you set up an ad from scratch, optimise it to reach the relevant audience, how to make your paid views also earn you earned views organically and finally how to draw visitors from these videos to your money pages / landing pages where you can generate revenue.
Some email marketers have also used "video gifs" as fallbacks for HTML5 videos. Unfortunately, while these will play on most email clients, the images are huge (think megabytes, not kb). The image quality is also fairly low, which is why while a few retailers tried these around 2008/2009, they’re rarely seen now. Other marketers have had some success with embedding YouTube videos in Gmail, but that's not a widely used tactic anymore.
Today, one of the biggest trends driving the digital marketing world is responsive design. When a company’s content doesn’t perform well on a given device or browser system, the business behind it loses traffic and suffers decreased conversions as a result. Fortunately, video content is fit for consumption on all devices, ranging from computers to mobile phones. This expands video’s reach and makes it more user-friendly and consumer-focused.
HTML5 is the latest popular language for embedding videos into emails. It offers significant benefits with rich media experience to viewers. With features like improved functionality and the video playing feature within web pages, HTML5 creates great interaction with the user. Another reason HTML5 is an advantage is that iOS devices do not support Flash.
We recently published an infographic on how powerful video will become. But the future has already arrived. This has been a full-on video revolution year for marketers. According to Wyzowl statistics, 63% of businesses have started using video content marketing. Out of those 82% of businesses feel video marketing is an important part of their strategy. Video is progressing rapidly and will reach new heights sooner than we think. This trend is fueled by 83% of businesses believing that video marketing gives them a good ROI.
As Kirsty Deeble-Rogers of D-R Ads tells us, “People often spend too much time worrying about creating different content for each platform. It’s true that square videos work better on Facebook and portrait videos are better for Instagram but that doesn’t mean each platform needs difference content, just reformat your Facebook posts to work on Instagram, Twitter, etc.”
A little like how we are unlikely to click on an email if we’re not inspired by the subject line, an incredible one fifth of viewers click off a video within 10 seconds if they’re not interested in what they see. With this in mind, the introduction of the video is vitally important and should be made inspiring, entertaining and informative, to hook the viewer and encourage them to view the whole of the video.
Some email marketers have also used "video gifs" as fallbacks for HTML5 videos. Unfortunately, while these will play on most email clients, the images are huge (think megabytes, not kb). The image quality is also fairly low, which is why while a few retailers tried these around 2008/2009, they’re rarely seen now. Other marketers have had some success with embedding YouTube videos in Gmail, but that's not a widely used tactic anymore.
The popularity of video also means that more content at the top of the funnel has to be in video format. In B2C it’s almost obvious. But B2B-people are people, too. Video content is more likely to keep the audience in the comfort zone, and they will not engage in system 2 thinking. System 1 autopilot mental state should lead to less critical thinking, less friction, and more conversions.
The solution to this is twofold. Add captions to every video you upload and make sure your visual content is eye-catching and appeals to your audience without relying on audio. To illustrate, if your video is for surfers, setting it on the beach with surfers in the background will instantly make it more appealing to that audience as they scroll through the feed.
Thanks to its viral nature, simple accessibility and built-in value, video marketing stands out as a smart way to approach content marketing in 2017 and beyond. Video marketing is an incredible way to create content that is personal and has a real impact on your audience. It has an incomparable ability to create emotion driven sales – and sales are always personal on some level. Buyers want to feel good about their choice, and video marketing, when done correctly, is the best way to create this feeling.
The popularity of video also means that more content at the top of the funnel has to be in video format. In B2C it’s almost obvious. But B2B-people are people, too. Video content is more likely to keep the audience in the comfort zone, and they will not engage in system 2 thinking. System 1 autopilot mental state should lead to less critical thinking, less friction, and more conversions.
2. The content quality is very important, but the production quality is not that important. Production quality and technical aspects have to be OK but not world class. Better production quality is correlated with more trust, but it can’t make up for the lack of substance. So, Facebook Live videos, webinar recordings, and other video material with good enough production quality will work as long as the content itself is engaging.

There are endless platforms for video marketing. YouTube, broadcast television, video boards and street marketing, you name it. The possibilities are endless. With a smartphone, consumers can access online video anytime, anywhere. The same is not true with traditional, paper marketing. With video, you can reach your audience wherever they are in a cost-effective way.
Some email marketers have also used "video gifs" as fallbacks for HTML5 videos. Unfortunately, while these will play on most email clients, the images are huge (think megabytes, not kb). The image quality is also fairly low, which is why while a few retailers tried these around 2008/2009, they’re rarely seen now. Other marketers have had some success with embedding YouTube videos in Gmail, but that's not a widely used tactic anymore.

Another good news is that your videos don’t have to be perfect. It’s the content that matters! Latest research shows that users are mostly put off by videos that don’t explain the product or service clearly enough. Low quality and poor design didn’t matter nearly as much. So it’s fair to say that video is like pizza – when it’s bad, it’s still pretty good!
Be sure to look at the tech support offered by each of these companies, as we felt many weren't as available as we would have liked. You'll find that some offer 24/7 phone support, live chat, and email help, while others leave you to rely on online documentation and limited live support hours. The best services offer a combination of self-serve help resources—where you can search FAQs and articles to find your own answers—as well as live support via chat or phone when you can't solve an issue yourself. We cover all of these concerns in our reviews, plus you can get an overview in the feature chart above.

Unfortunately, animated gifs don't work in Outlook. All you'll see of an animated gif in an Outlook client is the first frame of the gif. While that's a significant limitation (especially for B2B marketers, who usually have a larger percentage of Outlook users than B2C marketers), there is a work-around. Just create a first frame that also works as a static image.

From these challenges, rise video marketing best practices. And it all comes down to strategy: If you want your video marketing to have results, then you must plan, test, analyze, and test again. Yes, the goal of your videos is to tell a story and engage your customers but, from a marketing perspective, your videos must also align to your sales funnel. What is the purpose of each video? Who is the audience? How does the video further your marketing goals?
Sometimes businesses get so caught up in producing riveting content that they forget to prioritize branding. Sure, you need viewers to enjoy your videos, but they still need to understand the connection between the content and your company. If they don’t see the connection between the topic and your product – or, even worse, aren’t clear on who made the video – then their interest will fizzle out.
Lighting can also be a game-changer. Use natural light whenever possible, but if not, consider using direct lamps to provide optimal lighting for the person or object you’re filming. This will help you control shadows and contrast. On the other hand, using basic three-point lighting will help give your subject more dimension and overall make your video quality look more professional.

Michael Clarke, the author of “Social Media Marketing Made Stupidly Easy” has come up with a really simple lesson for everybody wanting to learn Video Marketing. He is a marketer turned entrepreneur who has built 4 profitable companies, where he incidentally uses video as his main method of lead generation and sales. Good ratings all around, this could be the simple course to help you get started.
Free accounts are limited to five minutes of published video time a month and 1 GB of cloud storage and 480p resolution. All users of paid WeVideo accounts enjoy the ability to publish videos without the WeVideo watermark or bumper, access to a much larger music library, better resolutions and advanced editing features like screen recording and green screen.
When looking into descriptions and titles, utilize YouTube’s auto-suggest results. Begin by searching for a specific keyword/term relevant to your video content and you’ll find the most popular search terms are auto-filled. You’ll see long-tail options which can help you determine what you should incorporate into your title and description or even give you ideas for future videos.

When looking into descriptions and titles, utilize YouTube’s auto-suggest results. Begin by searching for a specific keyword/term relevant to your video content and you’ll find the most popular search terms are auto-filled. You’ll see long-tail options which can help you determine what you should incorporate into your title and description or even give you ideas for future videos.
Thanks for referencing some of work here Liis. Like everything online, though, you need to be strategic in promoting your video. The content, messaging, and the promotion channels all contribute to the success or failure of your video marketing strategy.We wrote an interesting article here based on a related subjec, hope you like it ! https://thevideoanimationcompany.com/marketing/what-is-an-explainer-video-and-do-you-really-need-one
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