There’s plenty of incentive to try. Videos have been shown to nearly triple ROI over static emails. They open up communication opportunities that words can’t touch, and that even static images can’t beat. The 2014 Online Video Marketing Survey and Trends Report, published by Flimp Video Management, found that 82% of the marketers they surveyed say video email marketing is effective.


Not all corporate videos need to be serious. On the contrary, some humour can work well in generating more interest in your video. Vidyard gives an example of a humorous marketing video that proved hugely successful — a parody by cloud invoicing provider Taulia of the award-winning commercial series ‘Get Rid of Cable’ by Direct TV. As Vidyard writes:
If you can explain a new feature with an animated gif, you could send them in customer support emails to explain how to solve customers’ most common problems. Some SAAS companies actually give all their customer service people access to the screen capture app Jing. When a customer has a problem, the customer service people just make a 1-2 minute video explaining how to do what the customer wants. They send the video. This saves writing long explanations, and is more helpful to the customers.
The other critical component is the marketing of your videos. I have developed relationships by helping other bloggers and webmasters in my niche, who have allowed me to post guest contributions on their websites. This way, a proportion of people who visit another website will visit mine, and a proportion of people who visit my website linked from the guest post will subscribe to my email list, RSS feed, Twitter, YouTube, Digg and Facebook digital assets.
As you probably know, the most common workaround for embedded videos is to create a “fallback image”. This is a static image that users will see if they can’t view the video. Or you can just make an image that looks like the video, complete with the player controls at the bottom. While I was searching through several thousand emails to find examples for you, it was these static images that just looked like videos that were used 95% of the time.
Video really is not only the here and now of marketing but also the future. We’re in place where we can see UCG turn into branded content and kill it on social and, maybe, the next step will be more brands creating marketing videos for VR, AR, and the likes. All this shows us is that mastering video is super important, especially for small businesses. So these tips are super helpful for all of us because the more videos we make the better our marketing results and the better our skills. Luckily, for small brands and companies with the smaller budgets, creating video isn’t out of reach. Between live platforms like Facebook Live and YouTube Live and online tools like wistia.com and slide.ly/promo, it’s getting so much easier to create really high quality videos at any budget size. Gone are the days of spending thousands on video campaigns and so are the days of the big brands getting and staying in the spotlight. I don’t know about you, but I’m excited to see what the smaller, indie brands start to do with their small budgets and all these new(ish) video tools–especially after they read articles with great tips like this one. 

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Jide Alufa of Sophiads explains, “Many businesses create videos and launch them giving their audience the barn and the kitchen sink of information on their services which can be overwhelming. During your first videos, it’s important to teach the what, not the how. Here are some questions you can ask yourself to get you started: What is your service? What is it about? What does it do for your customers? What is the end result? What happened to others who used your service?”

Similar to how all blog posts and content should have a call to action at the end, which invites the reader to take further action, such as signing up to a newsletter, or visiting a website, so too should a marketing video. Ask yourself, what do you want viewers to do when they’ve watched the video and then encourage them to do so without being overtly salesy.
Also, even if HTML5 videos can be viewed by more and more email users, there’s still going to be a significant group of users who can’t view embedded videos. Hopefully in a few years this group will be less than 10% for users, but we have to do our email marketing with the technology we have now. Because of that, we need to create an alternative for everyone who can’t see the videos. Fortunately, there's a great alternative to embedded videos. It's been widely tested, too.
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