We’ve all heard it – time and time again – video is all the rage right now. And that is especially true of social media. From visual platforms like Instagram who are now embracing video even more than images to the more serious of platforms, like LinkedIn, all social networks are clearly all about videos right now. As a business though, it can seem difficult at first glance to come up – and deliver – a great social media video marketing strategy.
Some email marketers have also used "video gifs" as fallbacks for HTML5 videos. Unfortunately, while these will play on most email clients, the images are huge (think megabytes, not kb). The image quality is also fairly low, which is why while a few retailers tried these around 2008/2009, they’re rarely seen now. Other marketers have had some success with embedding YouTube videos in Gmail, but that's not a widely used tactic anymore. 

Each of those tactics requires different tools when it comes to ceation of the source email, dissemination to specific recipients, and integration with other back-end systems, notably the accounting system, the customer relationship management (CRM) system, and possibly even the inventory management system. You can manage your contacts by simply keeping a list of names and email addresses, or you can create a complex database full of subscribers segmented by demographic slices and engagement levels. Which method you choose really just depends on how much of your budget you're willing to allocate towards the email marketing software that can give your company the features it needs.

Bottom line, overall strategy and data should drive your video marketing strategy. First, plan a solid strategy to develop video(s) for each level of your sales funnel. Outline the content and goals of each individual video. Determine what metrics will best determine a video’s success. Then, test. Analyze. Tweak your videos (and their deployment), when necessary. Work to make them more effective. And whatever you do, do do video; in 2017 and beyond, it’s the cornerstone of your brand’s marketing efforts.

We recently published an infographic on how powerful video will become. But the future has already arrived. This has been a full-on video revolution year for marketers. According to Wyzowl statistics, 63% of businesses have started using video content marketing. Out of those 82% of businesses feel video marketing is an important part of their strategy. Video is progressing rapidly and will reach new heights sooner than we think. This trend is fueled by 83% of businesses believing that video marketing gives them a good ROI.
Another good news is that your videos don’t have to be perfect. It’s the content that matters! Latest research shows that users are mostly put off by videos that don’t explain the product or service clearly enough. Low quality and poor design didn’t matter nearly as much. So it’s fair to say that video is like pizza – when it’s bad, it’s still pretty good!
If you want to make your animated gifs even smaller, run the individual frames through a tool like Jpegmini. If you use a minimizer like that first (in addition to saving for web in Photoshop, too, of course) it’s often possible to cut the size of an animated gifs down to one third of its original size. That can make the difference between having animated gifs be a viable or unrealistic technique.

Bottom line, overall strategy and data should drive your video marketing strategy. First, plan a solid strategy to develop video(s) for each level of your sales funnel. Outline the content and goals of each individual video. Determine what metrics will best determine a video’s success. Then, test. Analyze. Tweak your videos (and their deployment), when necessary. Work to make them more effective. And whatever you do, do do video; in 2017 and beyond, it’s the cornerstone of your brand’s marketing efforts.


Be sure to look at the tech support offered by each of these companies, as we felt many weren't as available as we would have liked. You'll find that some offer 24/7 phone support, live chat, and email help, while others leave you to rely on online documentation and limited live support hours. The best services offer a combination of self-serve help resources—where you can search FAQs and articles to find your own answers—as well as live support via chat or phone when you can't solve an issue yourself. We cover all of these concerns in our reviews, plus you can get an overview in the feature chart above.
A little like how we are unlikely to click on an email if we’re not inspired by the subject line, an incredible one fifth of viewers click off a video within 10 seconds if they’re not interested in what they see. With this in mind, the introduction of the video is vitally important and should be made inspiring, entertaining and informative, to hook the viewer and encourage them to view the whole of the video.
.GIFs are effective for images with simple graphics, limited colors, text images (like logos), etc. .GIFs usually are limited to 256 colors. But, it supports animation, so it is good for email design. Also, these files can be compressed into a smaller file size. Animated .GIFs do not support animation the way Flash files do, but allow you to add movement without much programming or coding. You can use jQuery to generate animated effects.
Wave.video is one of my favourite video creators for several reasons: the platform is super intuitive and easy to use, it has a huge library of free and paid video clips and images (although it’s worth mentioning you can upload your own too), it supports over 30 different formats (and you can easily change between formats) and it has a great selection of ready-made video templates for all kinds of occasions: 

Unfortunately, animated gifs don't work in Outlook. All you'll see of an animated gif in an Outlook client is the first frame of the gif. While that's a significant limitation (especially for B2B marketers, who usually have a larger percentage of Outlook users than B2C marketers), there is a work-around. Just create a first frame that also works as a static image.
The definition of video marketing is not complex. In fact, it’s rather simple: using video to promote or market your brand, product or service. A strong marketing campaign incorporates video into the mix. Customer testimonials, videos from live events, how-to videos, explainer videos, corporate training videos, viral (entertainment) videos — the list goes on.
Bottom line, overall strategy and data should drive your video marketing strategy. First, plan a solid strategy to develop video(s) for each level of your sales funnel. Outline the content and goals of each individual video. Determine what metrics will best determine a video’s success. Then, test. Analyze. Tweak your videos (and their deployment), when necessary. Work to make them more effective. And whatever you do, do do video; in 2017 and beyond, it’s the cornerstone of your brand’s marketing efforts. 

These classes on video marketing will help you to learn the skills to take the first steps as a vlogger. Learn to write, film and create engaging content for your videos along with tips and advice from the instructors. The lectures have been designed to be concise and time efficient. Along with the basics of vlogging, there are courses that focus on animated storytelling in after effect among the many other techniques covered. By the end of the class, you will be proficient in the foundations of video creation and related skills.
If you want to make your animated gifs even smaller, run the individual frames through a tool like Jpegmini. If you use a minimizer like that first (in addition to saving for web in Photoshop, too, of course) it’s often possible to cut the size of an animated gifs down to one third of its original size. That can make the difference between having animated gifs be a viable or unrealistic technique.

To make your videos as memorable as possible, ensure that you’re keeping them in line with your brand strategy. This means keeping colors, fonts, logos and voice the same in your video marketing as they are in your blogs and articles. While videos do things text content doesn’t, users should still be able to recognize the style and format of your brand’s videos online.
It is estimated that 92% of people who consume mobile videos share them with other people. This is a massive portion and is higher than the share rate of many other types of content out there. Simply Measured discovered that video is shared 1,200% more than both links and text combined. Also, 60% of viewers will engage in a video post before a text post, according to Diode Digital. Because of this, video content is a powerful tool for any brand that wants to expand its reach online or enjoy wider audiences.

Search engines can’t digest every word of your video like the human ear, but that doesn’t mean you can’t optimize your video for search engines. Whether you’re deciding on the name of your video or the description, think about what search terms you want to get found under; what people would be searching for when they come across this particular video - just as you would when writing a blog article
The solution to this is twofold. Add captions to every video you upload and make sure your visual content is eye-catching and appeals to your audience without relying on audio. To illustrate, if your video is for surfers, setting it on the beach with surfers in the background will instantly make it more appealing to that audience as they scroll through the feed.
There are a lot of fantastic points in this article. Video is absolutely the way to go because of just how engaging it is with customers. But when dealing with mobile there are a couple things that you need to make sure you are doing. You need to capture their attention early since attention span on mobile (especially on apps like Facebook) is pretty low. Design the video for sound-off viewing with things like subtitles. Have a clear call to action at the end of your video. The last thing is to plan for vertical viewing since “people are 67% more likely to watch the full length of square videos than they are to watch horizontal ones.” (source: https://sundaysky.com/blog/5-mobile-video-best-practices/ )
The definition of video marketing is not complex. In fact, it’s rather simple: using video to promote or market your brand, product or service. A strong marketing campaign incorporates video into the mix. Customer testimonials, videos from live events, how-to videos, explainer videos, corporate training videos, viral (entertainment) videos — the list goes on.
As you probably know, the most common workaround for embedded videos is to create a “fallback image”. This is a static image that users will see if they can’t view the video. Or you can just make an image that looks like the video, complete with the player controls at the bottom. While I was searching through several thousand emails to find examples for you, it was these static images that just looked like videos that were used 95% of the time.
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