There are endless platforms for video marketing. YouTube, broadcast television, video boards and street marketing, you name it. The possibilities are endless. With a smartphone, consumers can access online video anytime, anywhere. The same is not true with traditional, paper marketing. With video, you can reach your audience wherever they are in a cost-effective way.
Search engines can’t digest every word of your video like the human ear, but that doesn’t mean you can’t optimize your video for search engines. Whether you’re deciding on the name of your video or the description, think about what search terms you want to get found under; what people would be searching for when they come across this particular video - just as you would when writing a blog article

It never hurts to review your past strategies before the new year. As you review all your marketing efforts and make plans for 2019, you can keep this list in mind! It’s going to be important to avoid these video marketing mistakes to stay ahead of your competition. If you’re planning to start video marketing this upcoming year, this will help give you ideas and steer you away from common errors.


By creating information-dense, accessible, easy-to-interact-with video content, brands can develop a substantial online following and promote customer recall. For an example of a company that’s done this particularly well, consider Headspace, a meditation app that became a $250 million business. The app offers multiple levels of meditation, employing gamification to increase engagement. Users must complete and master each meditation level before advancing. Most sessions are in video format, beautifully crafted with illustrations and layouts true to the brand. It is elegant, consistent and engaging, heavily relying on video.
Michael Clarke, the author of “Social Media Marketing Made Stupidly Easy” has come up with a really simple lesson for everybody wanting to learn Video Marketing. He is a marketer turned entrepreneur who has built 4 profitable companies, where he incidentally uses video as his main method of lead generation and sales. Good ratings all around, this could be the simple course to help you get started.
This course is for those of you who don’t just want to learn how to get more views but how to convert video views into business sales. You will learn how to create better video marketing campaigns, avoid challenges in using video marketing and implement simple principles to maximize results. This is great for anybody who has a direct online business, entrepreneurs who want to make the most of online videos for branding and sales, advertising and marketing folks who want to deliver ROI and value for their clients. Created by Sorin Constantin who is an Online Entrepreneur and Network Marketing Professional.
Reading your article, I’m amazed at the statistics you mentioned. I didn’t realize the impact a single video could have on a business. Marketing will always bring more traffic to your site but having videos does even more so. It’s impressive that when seeing a video of a product, 74% of those people will buy what they watched. I’ll be sure to tell me friends with business about this article so they can boost their customer viewings!
Once your thumbnail is ready and placed in your email, link it to the page your video is on. How this is done will depend on what software you’re using, but should be pretty easy (Google is your friend!) You can use a specific landing page or link directly to the platform where your video is hosted (i.e. YouTube, Vimeo, etc.) If you’ve made a video with Biteable, we’ve made it easy for you to post straight to YouTube.
Yes. Experian has reported that 72% of their clients who have used animated Gif’s or cinemagraphs in emails see higher transaction-to-click rates. And last year Dell saw a 109% lift in revenue when it tested an animated gif campaign. Nobody stats are as good as Helzberg Diamonds when it comes to animated gifs. They paired up this technique with personalization and saw a 288% lift. This particular email has become the gold standard (ahem) of what’s possible:
It is estimated that 92% of people who consume mobile videos share them with other people. This is a massive portion and is higher than the share rate of many other types of content out there. Simply Measured discovered that video is shared 1,200% more than both links and text combined. Also, 60% of viewers will engage in a video post before a text post, according to Diode Digital. Because of this, video content is a powerful tool for any brand that wants to expand its reach online or enjoy wider audiences.
When looking into descriptions and titles, utilize YouTube’s auto-suggest results. Begin by searching for a specific keyword/term relevant to your video content and you’ll find the most popular search terms are auto-filled. You’ll see long-tail options which can help you determine what you should incorporate into your title and description or even give you ideas for future videos.
When you are done editing your video, the next step is to “publish—our way of saying combine all the elements of your movie into a final MP4 file—at the resolution you want, so that you can share it anywhere. Publish time is the duration of your published videos. Look to the plan comparison chart on total available publish time per plan. For example, 1 hour per month will allow you to publish 20 videos that are each three minutes long, 12 videos that are each five minutes long, or any other combination that adds up to your total available publish time. Publish time is not affected by the amount of time you can spend working in the editor and/or the duration of your media assets. More information is available here.

Use Wildcard * search: It prompts the search engine to insert any words in place for it. It may trigger quite unexpected results, help you to brainstorm and even change the initial focus of your research. For example, “how to * hair” will find “How to cut your hair,” “How to curl your hair,” “How to: Avocado Hair Mask Tutorial” and many other interesting tutorials.

So put aside the idea that email marketing is as outdated as a fax machine, and see what adding some movement to your emails might do. Even if you don’t have extensive resources, the two lighter-weight alternatives to videos are easy to implement. Every email marketer needs to know about what’s possible now. Maybe a few of you will be inspired enough to try just one animated gif.
The definition of video marketing is not complex. In fact, it’s rather simple: using video to promote or market your brand, product or service. A strong marketing campaign incorporates video into the mix. Customer testimonials, videos from live events, how-to videos, explainer videos, corporate training videos, viral (entertainment) videos — the list goes on.
Getting started shouldn't be daunting. Generally, you'll know right away whether you like a user interface (UI) or not, and most of the contenders we reviewed offer free trials so you can poke around before dropping any cash. Luckily, most of these services have modern-looking graphics and uncluttered layouts. These are not the complex business software UIs of yesterday. Be careful, though, as some free trials require a credit card. This means you need to be sure to cancel your trial before you're billed if you're not happy with the service.
According to HubSpot, 80% of customers remember a video they’ve watched in the last month. One of the biggest strengths of video marketing is that it’s highly visual and auditory, which means it’s easier for many users to remember than text-based content. When customers remember your video marketing content, they also remember your brand, which translates to more sales and leads for you. What’s more, customers typically like to share videos they enjoy, which can expand your online reach.
Liis, I couldn’t agree more with everything you say here. It’s such a motivating stuff . I can’t believe how far video has come since the early YouTube days. Social video is now such an important tool to modern marketing that my clients keep asking for more. The results really speak for themselves. I also love how more and more tools pop up (like slide.ly/promo and wevideo.com) to help make videos more accessible and possible for brands and companies of all sizes, not just the big brands. It’s been an interesting journey watching video grow up until now, but, I can’t wait to see what the future of video marketing will look like.
Hi, thanks for a great blog. In our office we have a debate going on about whether all of this video hype that we’re experiencing from basically everywhere today is really just, well, a hype.. In line with more and more companies using video marketing, text as we know it might fade out, pictures as we know them might fade out, but if everybody starts using video, what will then happen? Today, video is commonly seen as a way to stand out and capture users’ attention, but what if every brand start publishing video solely? Will we still want to see as much video? Will we need to capture the viewers’ attention in 2 seconds instead of 10? What do you think it requires for companies to succeed with videos and stay on top if everybody else is doing the same?
As you probably know, the most common workaround for embedded videos is to create a “fallback image”. This is a static image that users will see if they can’t view the video. Or you can just make an image that looks like the video, complete with the player controls at the bottom. While I was searching through several thousand emails to find examples for you, it was these static images that just looked like videos that were used 95% of the time.
Videos allow you to increase the time spent by visitors on your site. Thus, longer exposure builds trust and signals search engines that your site has good content. Moovly gives us whopping statistics: You’re 53 times more likely show up first on Google if you have a video embedded on your website. Since Google now owns YouTube, there has been a significant increase in how much videos affect your search engine rank.

Use good video recording equipment to get excellent results. Go for a good selection from DSLR, which is known for good image quality, speed, quality optics and manual controls. Apart from this, you can also use video recording apps which can also help you shoot excellent video. For example, Camera Plus Pro helps in advanced video recording on any iOS device, along with other features like video filters, zooming and pause support. The hi-definition 8mm vintage camera gives your video a retro style.

Email has a bit of a reputation for being old-school. Some people think it’s downright stodgy. But that idea is as outdated as “email is dead”. Email is very much alive, so much so that many social media gurus have launched coaching programs for how to use email marketing. It took them awhile, but they’ve come to realize email is one of the biggest drivers of ROI around.
As a growing business, you may also be looking for a CRM solution, and you'll find that the more advanced email marketing services have begun to crossover into CRM. It makes sense: Both types of software deal with managing and communicating with customers. A handful of these services are one-stop shops, either offering both email marketing and CRM out of the box or as add-on services.
Lighting can also be a game-changer. Use natural light whenever possible, but if not, consider using direct lamps to provide optimal lighting for the person or object you’re filming. This will help you control shadows and contrast. On the other hand, using basic three-point lighting will help give your subject more dimension and overall make your video quality look more professional.
What's the difference between them? One-off communications versus prolonged, email-based interactions. For example, email marketing tools are excellent for one-off communications. You can use these tools for the one time you'd like to send someone an automated email response when they join a subscriber list, on their birthday, or when you promote a new product. But marketing automation tools are better suited for prolonged, email-based interactions. For example, you can use marketing automation tools whenever you want to guide someone from a subscriber list to a product purchase. Or you can send thank you emails or send new product promotions—all without having to lift a finger after the workflow is designed.
Michael Clarke, the author of “Social Media Marketing Made Stupidly Easy” has come up with a really simple lesson for everybody wanting to learn Video Marketing. He is a marketer turned entrepreneur who has built 4 profitable companies, where he incidentally uses video as his main method of lead generation and sales. Good ratings all around, this could be the simple course to help you get started.
There are endless platforms for video marketing. YouTube, broadcast television, video boards and street marketing, you name it. The possibilities are endless. With a smartphone, consumers can access online video anytime, anywhere. The same is not true with traditional, paper marketing. With video, you can reach your audience wherever they are in a cost-effective way.

Jide Alufa of Sophiads explains, “Many businesses create videos and launch them giving their audience the barn and the kitchen sink of information on their services which can be overwhelming. During your first videos, it’s important to teach the what, not the how. Here are some questions you can ask yourself to get you started: What is your service? What is it about? What does it do for your customers? What is the end result? What happened to others who used your service?”
As you probably know, the most common workaround for embedded videos is to create a “fallback image”. This is a static image that users will see if they can’t view the video. Or you can just make an image that looks like the video, complete with the player controls at the bottom. While I was searching through several thousand emails to find examples for you, it was these static images that just looked like videos that were used 95% of the time.
Yes. Experian has reported that 72% of their clients who have used animated Gif’s or cinemagraphs in emails see higher transaction-to-click rates. And last year Dell saw a 109% lift in revenue when it tested an animated gif campaign. Nobody stats are as good as Helzberg Diamonds when it comes to animated gifs. They paired up this technique with personalization and saw a 288% lift. This particular email has become the gold standard (ahem) of what’s possible:
Animated gifs are increasingly being classified as videos. Though they are radically stripped down from a true video, it only takes a couple of frames to make an image appear to move. This is one of the tricks to keeping animated gifs both small and engaging – they shouldn’t be much more than six or seven frames. Often three or four frames is the sweet spot. It’s just enough motion to be engaging.
Each of those tactics requires different tools when it comes to ceation of the source email, dissemination to specific recipients, and integration with other back-end systems, notably the accounting system, the customer relationship management (CRM) system, and possibly even the inventory management system. You can manage your contacts by simply keeping a list of names and email addresses, or you can create a complex database full of subscribers segmented by demographic slices and engagement levels. Which method you choose really just depends on how much of your budget you're willing to allocate towards the email marketing software that can give your company the features it needs.
To learn more about how video marketing can help convert customers and increase engagement with your brand, check out the infographic below from Vidyard (and for even more information, check out its Video in Business Benchmark Report). It breaks down 16 compelling video marketing statistics in the context of viewing platforms, distribution channels, business video consumption habits, and more.

As you probably know, the most common workaround for embedded videos is to create a “fallback image”. This is a static image that users will see if they can’t view the video. Or you can just make an image that looks like the video, complete with the player controls at the bottom. While I was searching through several thousand emails to find examples for you, it was these static images that just looked like videos that were used 95% of the time. 

The most underutilized space on YouTube is the description below the video where you can describe your service and put in your URL that can be clicked through. Add a call to action at the end of the video; for example, “If you liked this video, please click through my link below to find more information.” This is a great way to increase engagement. Also add the Annotations feature from YouTube to create links in the videos. This is very powerful.
One of the best ways to generate results with your marketing efforts is to design each piece of content to strategically accomplish a goal. On our website, for instance, we craft our home page to accomplish a specific goal, which differs from the goal of our Contact page, so we design that differently than our home page. Same with our sales page, product page, and About page. You likely do the same.
Search engines can’t digest every word of your video like the human ear, but that doesn’t mean you can’t optimize your video for search engines. Whether you’re deciding on the name of your video or the description, think about what search terms you want to get found under; what people would be searching for when they come across this particular video - just as you would when writing a blog article
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