Yes, you read that title correctly. That out of their minds, slightly alcoholic team over at Epic Meal Time were the first to teach me about YouTube marketing. As with all successful YouTube channels, they had to build their own channel themselves. There was no network backing them or an executive producer coming on board to show them the ropes. There wasn’t even anyone with any real experience!
Make a "Let's Play." Believe it or not, some of the biggest viral stars in the world are people who simply record themselves playing video games, then share the footage with their live commentary added in. These types of videos, which are called "Let's Play" videos, are a form of entertainment that's rapidly grown in popularity in the last few years, so you'll already have a built-in audience if you're able to put out funny, well-made content.

Beta Testing: Identify top influencers who can try your new product in beta and motivate them to review and talk about it before it goes to market. Their followers will be privy to ‘classified’ information that makes them feel great and they will want to know more about the product. Make sure that any bugs or confusion that are identified in this phase are solved before the product goes live. It could turn into a lessons learned blog!
Never underestimate the power of transparency and and relatability. And, know your audience! This video nails both, with the founder giving a personal story behind why he started the company, and speaking directly to people to like him, or parents of kids like he used to be. This video pulls heavily on the nostalgic heartstrings – and reminds how technology is truly changing the world for the better.
Patagonia’s video above also demonstrates the importance of setting up your video. Don’t just throw a video into your email without any explanation. You’ve got to let your subscribers know why they should watch the video and what it’s all about. If they know exactly what they’re getting, they’ll be more likely to watch. So, set up your video in the email.  

As you probably know, the most common workaround for embedded videos is to create a “fallback image”. This is a static image that users will see if they can’t view the video. Or you can just make an image that looks like the video, complete with the player controls at the bottom. While I was searching through several thousand emails to find examples for you, it was these static images that just looked like videos that were used 95% of the time.
As mentioned earlier, most platforms have an algorithm in place to determine the type of content that gets marked as viral, trending, popular, or hot content. In most cases, these algorithms look for engagement a piece of content receives in relation to the time that piece of content was published or in a specific timeframe. Let’s say that your viral marketing goal was to create a video that made the Trending charts on YouTube. Your video would have a shot if:
Patagonia’s video above also demonstrates the importance of setting up your video. Don’t just throw a video into your email without any explanation. You’ve got to let your subscribers know why they should watch the video and what it’s all about. If they know exactly what they’re getting, they’ll be more likely to watch. So, set up your video in the email. 
Give your customers the answers to the questions they are asking. Not sure where to find those questions? Check out tools like Answer the Public, Keywordtool.io, and Bloomberry. Each of these tools scour the web to find the most common questions around specific keyword themes. (Read Content Marketing Tools: The Ultimate List for all the tools you’ll ever need.) Identify top questions related to your business, and instead of answering in writing, make a video.
Beta Testing: Identify top influencers who can try your new product in beta and motivate them to review and talk about it before it goes to market. Their followers will be privy to ‘classified’ information that makes them feel great and they will want to know more about the product. Make sure that any bugs or confusion that are identified in this phase are solved before the product goes live. It could turn into a lessons learned blog!
Idea Starter #1 - Viral Video Piggybacking: One way to get directly into the viral arena is to piggyback a current viral video or trend. You will know which videos are going viral, you'll see them in your inbox, on Twitter, or on the front pages of many social websites. Do a parody of it, remake it, just make sure you don't infringe on anyone's copyright.
Patagonia’s video above also demonstrates the importance of setting up your video. Don’t just throw a video into your email without any explanation. You’ve got to let your subscribers know why they should watch the video and what it’s all about. If they know exactly what they’re getting, they’ll be more likely to watch. So, set up your video in the email. 
Another good news is that your videos don’t have to be perfect. It’s the content that matters! Latest research shows that users are mostly put off by videos that don’t explain the product or service clearly enough. Low quality and poor design didn’t matter nearly as much. So it’s fair to say that video is like pizza – when it’s bad, it’s still pretty good!
Make Yourself Recognizable: Your videos can be similar, but should offer a different message about your company or talk about other products and services. For example, you might start each video with a particular sound bite, image, or color theme to brand your videos. With the right marketing, this can help consumer viewers recognize other videos you produce. (You can also serial brand at the end of a video just be sure that all videos have at least one common, recognizable feature.)

Patagonia’s video above also demonstrates the importance of setting up your video. Don’t just throw a video into your email without any explanation. You’ve got to let your subscribers know why they should watch the video and what it’s all about. If they know exactly what they’re getting, they’ll be more likely to watch. So, set up your video in the email. 

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Humor: Whether planned or not, most viral videos are funny in some way. Sometimes it's unintentionally funny (Rebecca Black again, or the poor kid who thought he was a Jedi) or it could be a fall, a collection of flubs and so on. Other times, it's blatantly funny content, including parody, singing, dancing, clips from TV shows, re-cut movie trailers and so on. Another popular method is dubbing new audio over old clips (a prime example is the honey badger which contains some NSFW language). Now, humor is subjective, so getting a video to go viral should tap into things that people generally find funny. Most people love a good "epic fail," so that is a winning proposition. People also like watching other people make fools of themselves. Jackass was a popular TV show for a reason.

When Instagram first introduced video in 2013, more than 5 million videos were shared within the first 24 hours. We’re seeing a similar trend with Instagram Stories as marketers look to find what works on the new medium. What we do know is that the introduction of this new feature has opened up tons of new video marketing opportunities on Instagram.
For many of us in the online marketing industry, each year we wait with bated breath for Mary Meeker to release her annual Internet Trends report. We can’t wait to see what’s on the horizon, what new trends we need to be aware of, and of course, what’s old news. And each year, the report grows larger and new stats arise to surprise us. One of the most important trends concerns video content marketing.

Lauren Caitlin Upton: Upton, a contestant from South Carolina in the 2007 Miss Teen USA pageant was asked why Americans are unable to locate the U.S. on a map. She began, "I personally believe that U.S. Americans are unable to do so because some people out there in our nation don't have maps," and went on to reference "the Iraq" and "Asian countries." The video has had more than 39 million views. It perpetuates the dumb blond, dumb beauty queen stereotype. And, it makes the rest of us feel a little smarter.
Another good news is that your videos don’t have to be perfect. It’s the content that matters! Latest research shows that users are mostly put off by videos that don’t explain the product or service clearly enough. Low quality and poor design didn’t matter nearly as much. So it’s fair to say that video is like pizza – when it’s bad, it’s still pretty good!
Be positive, uplifting, or inspiring. As a very general rule, people like viral videos that make them feel good about themselves and/or the world more than they like pessimistic ones (though there are, of course, plenty of exceptions.) Academic research has found that, while viewers typically prefer content that evokes a strong emotional response, "happy" content tends to get shared most of all.[10]
Email has a bit of a reputation for being old-school. Some people think it’s downright stodgy. But that idea is as outdated as “email is dead”. Email is very much alive, so much so that many social media gurus have launched coaching programs for how to use email marketing. It took them awhile, but they’ve come to realize email is one of the biggest drivers of ROI around.

In 2013, Oreo jumped on the infamous moment when a power outage caused lights to go out during the Superbowl. In the 34th minute the Superdome experienced a slight blackout which Oreo’s social media team quickly jumped on. Posting a solitary Oreo on a black background with text reading “You can still dunk in the dark” on Twitter and Facebook, it quickly received over 10,000 retweets on Twitter and more than 20,000 likes on Facebook.


Idea Starter #1 - Viral Video Piggybacking: One way to get directly into the viral arena is to piggyback a current viral video or trend. You will know which videos are going viral, you'll see them in your inbox, on Twitter, or on the front pages of many social websites. Do a parody of it, remake it, just make sure you don't infringe on anyone's copyright.
Give your customers the answers to the questions they are asking. Not sure where to find those questions? Check out tools like Answer the Public, Keywordtool.io, and Bloomberry. Each of these tools scour the web to find the most common questions around specific keyword themes. (Read Content Marketing Tools: The Ultimate List for all the tools you’ll ever need.) Identify top questions related to your business, and instead of answering in writing, make a video.
Use the best equipment possible. Being shot in crystal-clear, high-resolution video as opposed to grainy cellphone footage never hurt a viral video's chances. If you want your video to look as good as possible, be willing to make the investment in professional equipment (or borrow a friend's.) Consider browsing our photography articles for technical information on how to get your shots looking amazing.
While videos used to be associated only as a branding medium for big companies, now it’s an essential part of performance marketing for every business with an online presence (aka everyone). According to a survey of 570 marketing professionals conducted by Wyzowl 85% of businesses regard video as an important part of their marketing strategy and 99% intend to continue to use video in 2018.
Unfortunately, animated gifs don't work in Outlook. All you'll see of an animated gif in an Outlook client is the first frame of the gif. While that's a significant limitation (especially for B2B marketers, who usually have a larger percentage of Outlook users than B2C marketers), there is a work-around. Just create a first frame that also works as a static image.

Second place went to Turkish Airlines, with The Selfie Shootout, which depicted sports stars Kobe Bryant and Lionel Messi sending each other self-portraits from a variety of exotic locations to which the airline flies. Third and fourth places, meanwhile, went to Volvo Trucks (with the Epic Split ad, featuring Jean-Claude van Damme) and Google (with its Chrome For campaign).


Liis, I couldn’t agree more with everything you say here. It’s such a motivating stuff . I can’t believe how far video has come since the early YouTube days. Social video is now such an important tool to modern marketing that my clients keep asking for more. The results really speak for themselves. I also love how more and more tools pop up (like slide.ly/promo and wevideo.com) to help make videos more accessible and possible for brands and companies of all sizes, not just the big brands. It’s been an interesting journey watching video grow up until now, but, I can’t wait to see what the future of video marketing will look like.
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