With the attention span of online users getting smaller each day, mobile devices taking the lead in the competition for screen time and more brands fighting for attention online, video has moved from an added element of a marketing strategy to an imperative piece of your content creation. Luckily, there are online tools that guide business owners, marketing gurus and social media managers from creation to execution with ease. So … lights, camera, action. Or should we say drag, drop and publish.
The simple answer is yes. The complex is answer is…well, it depends. There are a couple of problems to consider. When you think about it, when was the last time you actually watched a video within an email? If you’re a Gmail user, the answer is “I think I’ve watched a YouTube video a few times”. If you’re a Microsoft Outlook user – the answer is “never”. The same goes for email on iOS or Android devices.
The world of email marketing is changing every day, and as more and more brands recognize the value of email marketing – the more difficult it is to stand out in your customers’ inboxes. One way brands can differentiate themselves in email is through video. In fact, including video in your email marketing campaigns and subject lines can increase open rates by 19% and click-through-rates of 200-300%.

The best way to leverage the power of video in your email campaigns is to use animated GIFs to drive attention to the most seductive of internet activity: moving images. Your audience has become accustomed to short snippets of video previewing the content they are about to watch, including previews on major streaming platforms like YouTube and Netflix.


Viral Tip: For the best chance at success, try to limit yourself to things that people can't see from anyone else. For example, being able to dunk on a regulation hoop is pretty amazing, but it's something people anyone who watches basketball has seen before. Being able to dunk over a friend's head, on the other hand, is a lot rarer and more impressive.
Animated gifs are increasingly being classified as videos. Though they are radically stripped down from a true video, it only takes a couple of frames to make an image appear to move. This is one of the tricks to keeping animated gifs both small and engaging – they shouldn’t be much more than six or seven frames. Often three or four frames is the sweet spot. It’s just enough motion to be engaging.
Low budget: Most viral videos have not blown the budget on fancy effects, big actors and lavish locations. They are usually videos that have been done on very little money or were simply captured on a cell phone camera or another cheap recording device. That's not to say there is no big budget viral videos (just take a look at Rebecca Black's Friday, that was not exactly cheap to produce) but generally, content is way more important than budget. Also, there is the appearance of low budget. Take, for example, the Chuck Testa taxidermy commercial. It looks cheap and tacky, and so far has had over 17 million views. But, it was masterminded by YouTube stars Rhett and Link for their IFC TV series Commercial Kings. Either way, low budget, whether real or faked, can be a great way to get videos to go viral. People don't usually like sharing fancy ads that cost millions of dollars unless they are very, very cool.
These are not the only signals that help a video ascend to the trending charts for the day, however. YouTube collects additional engagement data for videos including like and dislike counts, comments, and – most importantly – how long users watch the video. They specifically state that, “…the video with the highest view count on a given day may not be #1 on Trending, and videos with more views may be shown below videos with fewer views.”
Remember the longer video is not to go too long you still look to think about your audience’s attention span so no longer than 60 seconds and the content should be just as tailored To their interest if you’re writing and have to written email. So not just a generic blast it needs to be about them at their interest maybe their job title their specific pain points and other things like that that might make them a little bit more interested and
Gary has always loved media, entertainment and technology and is really glad he gets to “work” in these fields. He joined GoAnimate in 2011, after spending ten years in Asia working with Wego.com, Mediacorp Raintree Pictures, Yahoo! Southeast Asia, and MTV Asia. He holds a BA (Magna Cum Laude) from NYU, an MFA in Film from Northwestern, and an MBA (With Distinction) from INSEAD. Follow Gary at @L1pk0 and GoAnimate at @GoAnimate.

Currently, the online market is buzzing excitedly about upbeat trends in video email marketing that is drawing a lot of attention from viewers as well as marketers. For better email marketing results, salespeople should study the web analytics and user engagement behavior affected by video email marketing. And, if you follow the points discussed in this post, you definitely can plan things well for your business.


Time-sensitive promotions: You’re using price breaks to close warm or stuck leads. Why not invest in video for something simple and numbers-driven like price promotions? A typical consumer gets over 10 promotional emails per day. Your price promotion will not perform well if it’s not seen – and video helps to increase open rates. Plus the richer experience of videos – music, sound effects, voice, etc. – drive home what’s special about your promotion.
With the attention span of online users getting smaller each day, mobile devices taking the lead in the competition for screen time and more brands fighting for attention online, video has moved from an added element of a marketing strategy to an imperative piece of your content creation. Luckily, there are online tools that guide business owners, marketing gurus and social media managers from creation to execution with ease. So … lights, camera, action. Or should we say drag, drop and publish.
Provocation: From thought-provoking, to just downright inflammatory, viral videos go viral because they say or do something that gets the public's attention in some way. "OMG, you won't believe what I just saw" is a common reaction to viral videos. And people want to share that feeling with friends and family. That's why bad driving, store hold-ups, racial rants, sex tapes, politics, and numerous other provocative themes, are often doing the viral video rounds. Sometimes, it can be too provocative and end up being removed from YouTube and other channels, so it's a fine line to walk. You want to get people fired up enough to share it, without being so fired up that they complain to the people who can remove it.
You produce a video and post it publicly on YouTube to gain maximum reach and earned views. In this case, the video itself (due to Google’s high rank for YouTube) moves up your search engine rankings. The call to action in your video will attempt to direct traffic back to the white paper on your site … but in return for YouTube’s incredible reach and rank, you risk your leads getting distracted by other YouTube videos instead of following your call to action.
Dig up something tacky from the past. It's amazing how quickly pop culture that seems cutting-edge at the time becomes embarrassingly dated. Older music, fashion, TV shows, and so on can be absolutely cringe-inducing with a decade or two of hindsight. Unearthing an old, forgotten gem of retro cheese and uploading it to the internet can be an unorthodox path to viral success, but it's one that can truly pay off if you hit the jackpot — consider how the practice of "Rickrolling" became a cultural touchstone based off of a decades-old music video by Rick Astley. 

It is hard to know when a marketing campaign has truly been successful but with viral marketing campaigns it is more so. Even if you receive lots of free publicity and traffic to your website, if the aim of the campaign was to increase sales and this hasn’t been achieved then the success of the campaign is questionable. Today success metrics and Key Performance Indicators (KPI) are hugely important in marketing departments, and setting these metrics needs to happen in the planning phase. Track these figures regularly in the days after the campaign goes live to really understand the success behind your campaign. This can help you optimize your activities in real-time so you can get the most out of your efforts.
Provocation: From thought-provoking, to just downright inflammatory, viral videos go viral because they say or do something that gets the public's attention in some way. "OMG, you won't believe what I just saw" is a common reaction to viral videos. And people want to share that feeling with friends and family. That's why bad driving, store hold-ups, racial rants, sex tapes, politics, and numerous other provocative themes, are often doing the viral video rounds. Sometimes, it can be too provocative and end up being removed from YouTube and other channels, so it's a fine line to walk. You want to get people fired up enough to share it, without being so fired up that they complain to the people who can remove it.
Make Yourself Recognizable: Your videos can be similar, but should offer a different message about your company or talk about other products and services. For example, you might start each video with a particular sound bite, image, or color theme to brand your videos. With the right marketing, this can help consumer viewers recognize other videos you produce. (You can also serial brand at the end of a video just be sure that all videos have at least one common, recognizable feature.)

Viral content reaches people in different ways, depending on the platform they are using. YouTube users, for example, can browse trending videos. According to YouTube Help, YouTube evaluates signals such as the video’s view count, rate of growth in views, where the views originate from (i.e., YouTube search results vs. an embedded video in a blog post), and when the video was published.
Well, quite simply, it's a video that becomes popular without having any traditional advertising to support it. Viral videos are passed around via email, Internet sites, and cell phones. In effect, the general public becomes the driver of the video's immense popularity. However, in recent times, videos have gone viral after driving views by traditional methods. Basically, an ad buy starts the wave (much like priming the motor on a lawn mower) and then the public bites, and it takes off. There is nothing wrong with this way of doing things, but to be fair, it's not a purely viral video.

In September 2018 Nike launched their 30th anniversary campaign of the iconic tagline “Just do it” with a video of many athletes, including Serena Williams, Lebron James and most notable Colin Kaepernick. The most important element of this campaign was the inspirational tone that equates to Nike’s tagline. After the release of this campaign social media blew up with people taking inspiration and offense to this message. Even President Trump voiced his opinion against the brand’s work. Of course those who supported the messaging understood the need to stand up for injustices no matter who is being treated unfairly.
Pro-tip: This video type can be challenging to do if you’re only reviewing your own products. However, there is a workaround here. Instead of reviewing your own products, you can review products that complement your own. For example, if your eCommerce website sells backpacks for the modern traveler, other products that might interest your audience could be camera gear, space-saving products for a backpack, and so on. This allows you to focus your reviews on something else while keeping your own product on display. These type of reviews make you an authority in your field and cultivates a sense of trust among potential customers.
As mentioned earlier, most platforms have an algorithm in place to determine the type of content that gets marked as viral, trending, popular, or hot content. In most cases, these algorithms look for engagement a piece of content receives in relation to the time that piece of content was published or in a specific timeframe. Let’s say that your viral marketing goal was to create a video that made the Trending charts on YouTube. Your video would have a shot if:

The world of email marketing is changing every day, and as more and more brands recognize the value of email marketing – the more difficult it is to stand out in your customers’ inboxes. One way brands can differentiate themselves in email is through video. In fact, including video in your email marketing campaigns and subject lines can increase open rates by 19% and click-through-rates of 200-300%.


You can work with an agency to develop the videos. This option is more expensive, and you will often end up spending thousands of dollars for a single video. However, you get what you pay for. If you’re looking to create a single, impactful video (or if you have a healthy marketing budget), working with professionals is certainly a beneficial option.
What you need are deep insights into your audience. To find them you'll need to run surveys, conduct interviews and sift through data. Start by gathering basic information like demographics, then move onto more detailed considerations of personality and preferences. Be sure to get to the root of what your audience need, what they want, and which problems you can help them with.
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