Be positive, uplifting, or inspiring. As a very general rule, people like viral videos that make them feel good about themselves and/or the world more than they like pessimistic ones (though there are, of course, plenty of exceptions.) Academic research has found that, while viewers typically prefer content that evokes a strong emotional response, "happy" content tends to get shared most of all.[10]
Have you heard about a new marketing tool, a medium that’s being used all over the internet? It’s uncanny, your email click-through rate could be increased by up to 300 percent and your unsubscribe rate could be reduced by 75 percent. By now you’re probably thinking that we’re talking about some pricey, heavy-hitter enterprise software system, but we’re not. It’s a medium you already use every day. The answer is short and simple – it’s video.

A final video worth mentioning was never intended to be humiliating to singer Rick Astley. Yet for some reason, someone somewhere decided the video, "Never Gonna Give You Up" was a hoot and began sending links to the video on YouTube disguised as links to important news, jokes, or "must reads." This prank was soon known as "Rickrolling" and the term became as viral as the video itself.


I like to tell people I’m “Not very hip to what the kids are doing these days.” So when the whole mannequin challenge came about, I thought it was pretty pointless. But sure enough, star after star and brand after brand hopped on board, and now there are over 4.5 million YouTube results. My employer KoMarketing’s mannequin challenge also happens to be one of their top Facebook posts of all time. Who would’ve thought?
Well, quite simply, it's a video that becomes popular without having any traditional advertising to support it. Viral videos are passed around via email, Internet sites, and cell phones. In effect, the general public becomes the driver of the video's immense popularity. However, in recent times, videos have gone viral after driving views by traditional methods. Basically, an ad buy starts the wave (much like priming the motor on a lawn mower) and then the public bites, and it takes off. There is nothing wrong with this way of doing things, but to be fair, it's not a purely viral video.
Pam Neely has been marketing online for 15 years. She's a serial entrepreneur and an avid email and content marketing enthusiast with a background in publishing and journalism, including a New York Press Award. Her book "50 Ways to Build Your Email Marketing List" is available on Amazon.com. Pam holds a Master's Degree in Direct and Interactive Marketing from New York University. Follow her on Twitter @pamellaneely.
We recently published an infographic on how powerful video will become. But the future has already arrived. This has been a full-on video revolution year for marketers. According to Wyzowl statistics, 63% of businesses have started using video content marketing. Out of those 82% of businesses feel video marketing is an important part of their strategy. Video is progressing rapidly and will reach new heights sooner than we think. This trend is fueled by 83% of businesses believing that video marketing gives them a good ROI.
Along with all this talk of keeping videos short for  the viewer, it’s also true shorter content is a better format for most social platforms. As Forbes notes, short, concise content triumphs over longer forms of content, particularly on social media channels. Video marketers should consider using micro-video apps, which shorten videos to less than 10 seconds, so they’re ideal of sharing on the likes of Instagram and Twitter.
Teach your audience how to do something amazing. DIY and "How-to" videos are immensely popular online. Though these types of videos may not be as likely to get you the internet super-stardom that funny Let's Plays or meme videos are, they can bring their brand of popularity. For instance, the YouTube channel "DaveHax," which contains short how-to videos for basic crafts, routinely gets hundreds of thousands of views per video (sometimes even several million.)[5]
In fact, Buffer found that 83% of marketers said that they’d create more video if things like time, resources and budget were no longer an issue.  Limitations in these areas can be enough to keep us from moving forward. But fortunately, video marketing is becoming more and more accessible with video making platforms, like Promo.com, that address the need by saving both time and money, while providing professional-looking videos.
Use the best equipment possible. Being shot in crystal-clear, high-resolution video as opposed to grainy cellphone footage never hurt a viral video's chances. If you want your video to look as good as possible, be willing to make the investment in professional equipment (or borrow a friend's.) Consider browsing our photography articles for technical information on how to get your shots looking amazing.
Well, quite simply, it's a video that becomes popular without having any traditional advertising to support it. Viral videos are passed around via email, Internet sites, and cell phones. In effect, the general public becomes the driver of the video's immense popularity. However, in recent times, videos have gone viral after driving views by traditional methods. Basically, an ad buy starts the wave (much like priming the motor on a lawn mower) and then the public bites, and it takes off. There is nothing wrong with this way of doing things, but to be fair, it's not a purely viral video.
Make Yourself Recognizable: Your videos can be similar, but should offer a different message about your company or talk about other products and services. For example, you might start each video with a particular sound bite, image, or color theme to brand your videos. With the right marketing, this can help consumer viewers recognize other videos you produce. (You can also serial brand at the end of a video just be sure that all videos have at least one common, recognizable feature.)
Many marketing and research companies have come to the same conclusion – embedded video can drastically improve the impact of your email marketing efforts, and showing the most engagement are B2B and B2C audiences. This doesn’t mean you should take the subject lightly ’cause adding videos to emails you’re already sending simply won’t give you the results you’re looking for. If you want to use video effectively you have to rethink your whole email marketing campaign.
Use the best equipment possible. Being shot in crystal-clear, high-resolution video as opposed to grainy cellphone footage never hurt a viral video's chances. If you want your video to look as good as possible, be willing to make the investment in professional equipment (or borrow a friend's.) Consider browsing our photography articles for technical information on how to get your shots looking amazing.
Does this video take the 90’s tech vibe too far? Maybe – but it also does a great job at clearly explaining all the benefits to the razor in comparison to anything else on the market. Consumers comparison shop now more than ever. And, for products typically bought in-store, like Razors, it essential to have a video that shows consumers all the things they’d look for when purchasing in person.
Send out an email blast with personalized videos (by this I mean, put their name on the video) to all your existing customers. Add a list of items in this video that are relevant to the customer, products that they would potentially buy. You can get this data from their purchase history. Here is an example of the same video as above, but personalized:
Thanks to its viral nature, simple accessibility and built-in value, video marketing stands out as a smart way to approach content marketing in 2017 and beyond. Video marketing is an incredible way to create content that is personal and has a real impact on your audience. It has an incomparable ability to create emotion driven sales – and sales are always personal on some level. Buyers want to feel good about their choice, and video marketing, when done correctly, is the best way to create this feeling.
Words spoken with clarity and professionalism will always come out better in a corporate video than an amateur speaker, whose lack of experience speaking on the camera is obvious. With this in mind, it might be a good idea to have an employee that is experienced on speaking in front of the camera record for the video, or even think about calling in a professional. 
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